What to do if my Carbon Monoxide alarm goes off?

CO detectors, or carbon monoxide alarms, are essential for the detection of a deadly gas, carbon monoxide (CO). This gas cannot be seen, tasted or smelt and is only detected with the use of co detectors. It is produced through the incomplete combustion of fuel, such as gas, wood, coal and oil. If your carbon monoxide alarm is going off, do not assume it is a false alarm.

What to do when your carbon monoxide alarm is going off

You should assume that there is CO present and should follow these steps to ensure your safety.

  • Stay calm, open doors and windows to increase ventilation
  • Where safe to do so, turn off any fuel-burning appliance
  • Leave the premises and notify other occupants of the potential carbon monoxide leak (you should also notify any occupant of premises adjoined to your home as CO can seep through walls and floors
  • Call Gas Emergency Services 0800 111 999 or a local Gas Safe Registered Engineer to check for the source of carbon monoxide
  • Get medical help for anyone suffering from symptoms of CO poisoning

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning

The main symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are:

Carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms: persistent headaches

Persistent Headaches

Having persistent dull headaches and tension type headaches.

Carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms: dizziness

Dizziness

Having waves of dizziness or feeling light headed and off balance.

Carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms: nausea/vomiting

Nausea / Vomiting

Feeling like you need to be sick (nausea) and actually being sick (vomiting).

Carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms: stomach pains

Stomach Pains

Pains in your stomach or lower abdomen, sometimes accompanied by diarrhoea.

Carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms: difficulty breathing

Difficulty Breathing

Sudden shortness of breath or difficulty breathing (dyspnoea).

Carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms: tiredness

Tiredness

Having no energy or feeling tired, sleepy, lethargic and sluggish.

Carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms: sudden collapse

Sudden Collapse

Sudden collapse, seizures or loss of consciousness.

Carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms: confusion

Confusion

Confusion, difficulty concentrating and becoming easily irritated.

What causes CO detector false alarms?

A false alarm is when your CO detector alarms and where no carbon monoxide is detected by your engineer. There could be several reasons for this, which can often be easily resolved:

Cause of alarmWhat to do
The carbon monoxide detected did not come from your own appliances but may have seeped through the walls or floor from a neighbour.Check if your neighbours have fuel-burning appliances that might emit carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide might escape from chimney stacks allowing the toxic gas to enter your premises via a joint loft space.
The replace-by date may have been exceeded.Most CO alarms are only effective for 5-10 years. Once expired, they can sound erratically, or not sound when they should, The expiry date for each unit can be found on the information sticker on the back of the unit.
Excessive moisture from a bathroom may set off your CO alarm.CO alarms can be corrupted by steam, and therefore shouldn’t be installed in bathrooms. If your CO alarm is repeatedly triggered by steam, it may become ineffective, and should be replaced.
Lead acid battery chargers produce hydrogen gas which sets off CO detectors.If you are charging your caravan or boat battery at home, this could set off your CO alarm. Once you have made sure that the alarm is false, it is safe to ignore the alarm in this scenario, but remain vigilant for other signs. If this happens often, invest in a CO alarm with a digital display to assess the level of risk when the alarm sounds.
Freshly screeded floors emit a gas that sets off carbon monoxide alarms.If your floors have just been screeded, and you have made sure that the alarm is false, it is safe to ignore the alarm in this scenario, but remain vigilant for other signs.
The carbon monoxide alarm that you have installed may not be suitable for the type of premisesFor example if it is installed in a caravan, tent, boat or living quarters of a horsebox you will need to ensure that your alarm is Kitemarked to BS EN50291-2. Alarms tested to BS EN50291-1 are only for use in home environments and are not suitable for camping and caravanning.
Smoking indoorsA heavy smoker in a poorly ventilated room the CO from smoking may trigger an alarm. It is recommended to open a window if possible to improve ventilation. If this happens often, invest in a CO alarm with a digital display to assess the level of risk when the alarm sounds.
Homes that are adjacent to very busy roads may experience higher levels of CO in the home when windows are open as traffic fumes may enter the room and set your alarm off.If this causes persistent false alarms, invest in a digital CO alarm, allowing you to see a live CO reading. You can then determine the level of risk. For example, if the reading is high, there is probably a leak. However, if it has just tipped over the threshold due to air pollution, the alarm can be ignored/silenced without having to get an engineer in to check for a leak.
The sound that your alarm is making may not be the alarm sound to alert you that there are dangerous levels of CO present.Most alarms have several audible sounds to indicate things such as low battery warning or that there is a fault with the alarm. Keep the manual safe so that you can refer to it should the alarm go off.

Buying a CO detector

You should have a carbon monoxide detector in every room where there is a solid fuel burning appliance. Only chose CO detectors that have met the rigorous testing standards of the European standard EN50291. These alarms provide peace of mind that this vital alarm has been manufactured and tested to the highest standards. Moreover, investing in a CO detector with a digital display also provides peace of mind, as it allows you to assess the situation when an alarm goes off. This is particularly useful if you have had persistent false alarms due to pollution, smoking, or other external factors, as it allows you to check the reading to assess the level of risk before calling an engineer to check for a leak.

For more information about taking a carbon monoxide detector on holiday, read our blog on this ultimate travel essential, and what to do if you detect a leak.

Kidde Carbon Monoxide Alarm - 7DCO / 7DCOC
Kidde Carbon Monoxide Alarm - 7DCO / 7DCOC
  • Product Life: 10 years
  • Battery: replaceable AA alkaline batteries included
  • Warranty: 10 year warranty
  • Displays CO levels from 10ppm
  • Peak Level Memory - recalls highest CO levels
  • Ideal for domestic use and camping, caravans & boats
  • Kitemarked to BS EN50291-1 and BS EN50291-2
  • Also suitable for the 2022 Welsh legislation
£15.21 ex VAT
£18.25 inc VAT
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If you are unsure if you have the correct carbon monoxide alarm installed our customer care team are here to help. You can call them on 0800 612 6537 or email support@safelincs.co.uk.

Angie Dewick-Eisele

Director

Angie Dewick-Eisele is co-founder of Safelincs Ltd, one of the leading fire safety providers in the UK. Angie was Marketing Manager for many years and as Director is these days responsible for Content Management.

What is BAFE certification?

Safelincs prides itself on holding the BAFE accreditation for the maintenance of portable fire extinguishers, providing a visible way for our customers to recognise the professional competence of our nationwide team of BAFE-registered fire extinguisher servicing engineers. Here we look at some FAQs about the BAFE  certification.

What is BAFE certification?

BAFE certification is awarded to companies by an independent third-party certificated registration body for fire safety organisations across the UK.

The BAFE accreditation logo enables customers to identify the professional competence of the company they have commissioned. This provides peace of mind that all service work undertaken by companies like Safelincs is done to the same standard anywhere in the country.

Why is BAFE important?

BAFE provides the ability to assess and certify companies against fire safety quality standards and industry best practice. Independent evidence is gathered to support any certification process ensuring compliance and competency by fire safety providers.

Why should I use a BAFE-registered organisation?

Choosing fire protection from a BAFE-certified company ensures that the services and products conform to recognised standards. This provides peace of mind about quality and compliance.

Safelincs offer a range of extinguishers, installation, maintenance, and commissioning of fire extinguishers without tying companies into a long-term service agreement. To discuss your extinguisher maintenance needs, contact Safelincs on 0800 612 4827 or visit www.safelincs.co.uk

Safelincs BAFE registration number: 1216

Angie Dewick-Eisele

Director

Angie Dewick-Eisele is co-founder of Safelincs Ltd, one of the leading fire safety providers in the UK. Angie was Marketing Manager for many years and as Director is these days responsible for Content Management.

Free online fire safety log book for organisations with multiple sites

Safelincs has created a free online fire safety log book to help organisations to meet their legal obligations. Businesses and organisations must maintain fire safety log books to record regular equipment tests and findings to demonstrate compliance with the law, for example, traditional steel fire extinguishers have to be visually inspected monthly, serviced yearly and refilled after five years (except, of course, the service-free P50 fire extinguishers). Fire alarms, emergency lights, and other fire safety equipment must also be tested and serviced. Most inspections will be on different dates, so keeping track of your compliance can be a real challenge. If your company is spread over multiple sites, the challenge becomes even more daunting. Multiple members of staff will be involved in the compliance checking and will need to report their data to a central person.

log-book-2

The free online multi-user fire log book allows the recording of maintenance across multiple sites and also provides a reminder system for all people involved, sending automatic reminders until the safety check has been completed. The system gives the Responsible Person in an organisation a clear insight into the overall fire safety recording status. The fire safety log book holds all the data for you, you can print a copy at any time.

Other types of log books are available such as this fire log book template, but this type does not send automatic reminders to ensure that all fire safety checks are completed on time. Make fire safety compliance easy for your organisation and activate your free online fire safety log book.

Angie Dewick-Eisele

Director

Angie Dewick-Eisele is co-founder of Safelincs Ltd, one of the leading fire safety providers in the UK. Angie was Marketing Manager for many years and as Director is these days responsible for Content Management.

Safelincs and NFCC launch free Online Home Fire Safety Check resource

Safelincs are working in partnership with the National Fire Chiefs Council to launch a new Online Home Fire Safety Check (OHFSC) tool, available free of charge to all Fire Rescue Services in England.

Safelincs is pleased to announce the launch of a joint venture working in partnership with the National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) and the Home Office’s Fire Kills campaign, the Online Home Fire Safety Check Tool. This innovative online assessment tool will be made available to all households across England and will enable them to complete a home assessment to help identify fire hazards in their home. The tool will also suggest changes that can be easily made to reduce the risk of a fire.

National Fire Chiefs Council and Safelincs
Representatives from National Fire Chiefs Council and Safelincs at the South West Regional Workshop, Taunton, Somerset

Safelincs donated their time and expertise to build the system and will support and provide the system free of charge to all fire and rescue services across England. This tool will complement the NFCC Person-Centred Framework.  Neil Odin, Chair of NFCC’s Prevention Committee and NFCC’s Prevention Programme Executive, said, “We have been overwhelmed by the positive feedback from FRSs who attended the conference, with many having already signed up to the on-boarding process.” He went on to say “In the long-term NFCC would like to see all FRSs adopt the new Online Home Fire Safety Check and use as an integral part of their prevention activities. This, we hope, will provide a consistent approach to identifying and logging issues related to home safety prevention activities, and assist with centrally capturing valuable data which will be made available for all FRSs to use and plan future prevention strategies.”

Online Home Fire Safety Check
The Online Home Fire Safety Check Tool is available to all households in England

Safelincs have a passion for sharing free fire safety information with the public and working collaboratively with Fire Kills and NFCC to develop this online tool gives us great satisfaction. Harry Dewick-Eisele, MD Safelincs said ‘This co-operation has created a fire safety tool that makes a huge difference to people. It is easy to use and delivers well-tailored advice’

Complete the online home fire safety check for your home to see if you could improve your fire safety.

Angie Dewick-Eisele

Director

Angie Dewick-Eisele is co-founder of Safelincs Ltd, one of the leading fire safety providers in the UK. Angie was Marketing Manager for many years and as Director is these days responsible for Content Management.

Fire Exits: 10 Things Businesses Should Know

Fire Exit Regulations

Here’s a list of things you need to know about fire exits based on questions raised by customers and answered by fire safety professionals in our fire safety forum.

In this article we refer to FINAL fire exits when we mention fire exits or fire exit doors.

1. Is any door leading to the outside potentially a fire exit, including your normal entrance?

Not all doors leading to the outside can be used as a fire exit, sliding or revolving doors must not be used for exits specifically intended to be used as fire exits. Doors leading to enclosed courtyards might also not be suitable as fire exits.

In the event of a fire it must be possible for staff and visitors to evacuate your premises as quickly and as safely as possible. This is often through the door by which your staff or the public entered. However, additional fire exits will often be installed to reduce the escape distance or to provide an alternative exit in case the main entry/exit is blocked by fire.

2. Can final fire exit doors be left open?

Security may be a separate issue, but it is completely acceptable to have final fire exit doors standing open. The only time that this should not happen is if the final fire escape door is also acting as a fire-resistant door – although this would be very rare. The issue of fire exit doors left standing open is getting regularly confused with the issue of internal fire doors which must only be held open with a fire door retainer  and have a door closer fitted.

3. Must fire exits be easily opened from inside the building?

Fire exit doors must not be locked or fastened in a way that prevents them from being easily and immediately opened from the inside in an emergency. There are a variety of ways to secure fire exit doors in this way:

Panic bars

Also called push bars or crash bars, these are used where large numbers of people are attempting to travel at speed through a fire exit, as minimal pressure on the bar releases the locking mechanism.

Exidor 294 Panic Bar with Bolt
Exidor 294 Panic Bar with Bolt
  • Single door panic bar with vertical bolt (two point locking)
  • Non-handed - suitable for left and right-handed doors
  • Suitable for final exit doors in private and public buildings
  • Manufactured in the UK with a 10 year warranty
£66.69 ex VAT
£80.03 inc VAT
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Emergency push pads

Emergency push pads are similar to push bars but feature a small pad as opposed to a horizontal bar. They should only be used where a panic situation is unlikely to arise in an emergency evacuation scenario e.g. when only staff familiar with the building and not members of the general public are using the exit.

Briton 372 Single Door Emergency Push Pad with Bolt
Briton 372 Single Door Emergency Push Pad with Bolt
  • Fire exit push pad with vertical bolt (two point locking)
  • Suitable for left and right-handed doors
  • Suitable for non-public use buildings
  • 5 year manufacturer's warranty
£91.39 ex VAT
£109.67 inc VAT
Buy Now

Redlam panic bolt

This is designed for emergency doors which are not in normal everyday use and should only be opened for maintenance and testing. The bolt is NOT suitable for public areas.

Panic Bolt MK2 - Redlam
Panic Bolt MK2 - Redlam
  • Secures a final fire exit door from unauthorised use
  • When the Ceramtube is broken the panic bolt slides back and unlocks the door
  • Suitable for emergency exit hardware for commercial buildings
  • Does not jeopardise escape in the event of emergency
  • Please note: NOT suitable for public area installations
£59.39 ex VAT
£71.27 inc VAT
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Kingpin emergency bolt

This is similar to the Redlam bolt; when the handle is pulled, the Kingpin breaks into two pieces, allowing the spring-loaded bolt to retract and thus release the door. The door can, at all times, be used for non-emergency purposes by a key holder. Again, this bolt is not suitable for areas used by the general public.

Emergency Bolt - Kingpin
Emergency Bolt - Kingpin
  • The door can still be used in a non-emergency by the key holder
  • Pulling the handle releases the bolt for emergency escape
  • Secures single fire exit doors
  • Options for internal and external doors
£83.79 ex VAT
£100.55 inc VAT
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Maglock

Short for magnetic lock, this holds the door shut using an electromagnetic force between a magnet and a steel plate. Typically maglocks can have a keypad for access from outside and a green quick release button inside for use in an emergency. These systems can be wired into alarm systems that automatically release if the fire alarm system activates or the power supply fails.

Access Control Maglock Proximity Kit with Switch and Call Point
Access Control Maglock Proximity Kit with Switch and Call Point
  • Door is secured with an electromagnetic lock
  • Building access is controlled through a proximity reader
  • Suitable for outward opening single doors
  • Includes an exit button and emergency manual call point
£267.49 ex VAT
£320.99 inc VAT
Buy Now

4. Should fire exit doors always be unlocked whilst a building is in use?

Fire exit doors must not be locked with a key or padlock whilst a building is in use. However, when a building is unoccupied it can be locked as securely as required. If drastic security measures like chains, padlocks or steel bars are required, the first person entering the building in the morning must remove all of these.

It is generally recommended to create a wall mounted board containing the shapes of the security devices used (e.g. padlock) on which each item can be hung. This acts as a visual aid to stop staff forgetting that doors are still locked.

Forgetting to unlock security devices could lead to severe prosecution. We would therefore recommend to only use proper panic bars, etc. These can offer excellent security and allow safe escape in case of an emergency.

5. Can fire exit doors be any colour?

Yes, fire exit doors can be any colour. The important thing is that the exit doors are clearly signed.

6. Should fire exit doors open in the direction of escape?

Yes, fire exit doors should open in the direction of escape. However, in the workplace it may be permissible to have an exit door opening inwards if it is providing excess for less than 60 staff without public access.

7. Does the number of people using a building increase the number of fire exits that are required?

Yes, the more people that use a building will affect the number of fire exits required. The width of the fire exit is also influenced by this. For example, the minimum width of a fire escape catering for up to 60 people is 750mm. For full details of width requirements and the number of exits required, please see the Building Regulations section of the UK Government’s Planning Portal. See also our fire exit help and information page.

8. Must emergency routes and fire exits be indicated by signs?

Fire exit routes need to be marked clearly with emergency exit signs and have to be sufficiently lit, even when the electric power supply has failed. Therefore, emergency routes and fire exits usually require emergency lighting of adequate intensity. Final fire exits can be illuminated themselves or externally lit by an emergency light.

Fire Exit Signs from JALITE
Fire Exit Signs from JALITE
  • Rigid plastic for wall mounting
  • Photoluminescent (glow-in-the-dark)
  • Available in 3 different sizes
£5.49 ex VAT
£6.59 inc VAT
Buy Now

9. Must emergency routes and fire exits be kept clear of obstruction?

Final fire exit doors should never be blocked from the inside or outside. Equally, the internal escape routes must not be blocked. Combustible items that could catch alight can act as a fuel source for a fire and could increase the spread of a fire. These items should not be kept on corridors, stairways or circulation spaces. Such items include portable heaters (bottled gas or electric radiant heaters) and gas cylinders.

10. If the fire exit leads onto a road or car park, is a “No Parking” sign required?

It is important that the exit route is kept clear at all times. A ‘No Parking’ sign may be needed to prevent cars from parking directly in front of the final fire exit door. Additionally, a barrier could also be put in place.

More Information

View our related help guides for more information on fire exits and doors.

Angie Dewick-Eisele

Director

Angie Dewick-Eisele is co-founder of Safelincs Ltd, one of the leading fire safety providers in the UK. Angie was Marketing Manager for many years and as Director is these days responsible for Content Management.

Lighting the Way – Emergency Lighting Requirements

What you need to know about emergency lighting

Why is emergency lighting necessary?

As the responsible person it is your legal obligation to ensure that adequate emergency lighting is installed across all the escape routes and exits from every area of the building with a minimum backup duration of between 1 and 3 hours. Emergency lighting is essential to light escapes routes for emergency evacuations when normal mains-powered lighting fails.

Eden Bulkhead Emergency Lighting
LED Emergency Lighting Bulkhead – Eden

There are different types of emergency lights, some function as a normal light and others function only as an emergency light source. As a starting point you should know what type of emergency light you want to install for example; do you want a maintained emergency light (stays on constantly) or a non-maintained emergency light (illuminates only in the event of a mains power failure)?

Where to install emergency lights and signs

When deciding where to install emergency lights, take into account any hazards that there may be along the evacuation route, such as corners, stairways or uneven flooring. You must also ensure that fire alarm call points and equipment used for firefighting, such as extinguishers or fire blankets, are adequately illuminated to be easily seen or located. Some areas will require continued operation (e.g. a chemical processing room, operation theatre etc); higher continued lighting requirements must be considered in these areas.

Jalite photoluminescent fire exit signs
Jalite photoluminescent fire exit signs

A sub-category of emergency lighting is fire exit signs, which are green ‘running man’ signs with arrows that guide people towards the nearest exits. These are either internally lit in the same fashion as space emergency lighting or, in case sufficient other emergency lights are available, they can be photoluminescent. Such ‘glow-in-the-dark signs store energy from either natural or artificial light and releases this stored energy when the light source is no longer there, emitting a yellow/green glow to illuminate the text on the sign.

You should refer to your fire risk assessment to ensure that you have covered all the essential fire escape routes and addressed any hazards on your site that were highlighted in this assessment. It is a legal requirement to carry out a fire risk assessment and you should refresh this assessment if the activities within your premises change or if significant changes to the layout are made. You can find authoritative guidance in the government's fire risk assessment guides.

Buy emergency lights

Visit our emergency lights and signs section to view our full range of emergency lighting products.

Testing and maintenance

As with all fire safety equipment, regular testing of your emergency lights must be carried out to ensure that it is working correctly. You should test that the lights are triggered when the mains supply is cut, and also that all the lights are illuminated as they should be. This can be done with the use of a fish key.

You will need to test your lighting once a month and ensure that a full discharge test is carried once a year. Log the results as any other fire safety equipment tests in your fire safety logbook.

If you would like to know more about emergency lighting our emergency lighting guides can provide you with useful information.

Free reminder service

Sign up to our free reminder service to receive text or email reminders to regularly test your emergency lighting.

More information

Angie Dewick-Eisele

Director

Angie Dewick-Eisele is co-founder of Safelincs Ltd, one of the leading fire safety providers in the UK. Angie was Marketing Manager for many years and as Director is these days responsible for Content Management.

Fire Door Retainers Hold Fire Doors Open Hygienically

With concerns of the coronavirus being spread through contact with door handles and hand plates, many companies and health care settings are looking for solutions to hold fire doors open; reducing the need to touch door handles, without compromising fire safety.

Fire door retainers, such as Dorgard Original and Dorgard SmartSound, hold fire doors open legally and hygienically.

Dorgard Fire Door Retainers offer easy-to-install solutions that can be fitted to an existing fire door in around ten minutes by your own handyman, without the need to book an engineer to install. By fitting your fire doors with either the Dorgard Original or the upgraded version Dorgard SmartSound, you can hold fire doors open legally and eliminate the need to open the door using the handle once the Dorgard plunger has been depressed. This reduces the risk of germs and viruses spreading. The Dorgard will let the fire door close automatically when a fire alarm sounds, as the devices recognise the sound of a fire alarm.

For settings where at night time the doors should be closed, the Dorgard can be programmed to self-close at a specific time.

Call us today to speak with a customer service adviser on 0800 612 6537.

Angie Dewick-Eisele

Director

Angie Dewick-Eisele is co-founder of Safelincs Ltd, one of the leading fire safety providers in the UK. Angie was Marketing Manager for many years and as Director is these days responsible for Content Management.

Safelincs supports Buses 4 Homeless

Buses 4 Homeless is a social enterprise that was set up by Dan Atkins with a mission to provide 14,600 nights of sleep a year for the homeless. This exciting project, offering a three-month rehabilitation programme to vulnerable homeless people, is run from four refurbished double-decker buses and aims to re-engage homeless people back into the community.

Dan contacted Safelincs to ask for advice about fire safety and when we heard about the project we decided to get involved and donate a state of the art Zerio Plus wireless fire detection system, fire extinguishers, and a fire escape ladder. Installing the equipment enabled the first guests to be welcomed onto the project just before Christmas. Dan Atkins said “I picked up the phone and called Safelincs, spoke about the project and what we are doing. Everyone at Safelincs has been so supportive”. Dan went on to say “it is humbling to have such support”.

The buses provide four very distinct areas for the guests including sleeping accommodation, dining, wellbeing, and education. Each individual has the opportunity to work on their own specific areas and issues that led them to become homeless, learn new skills and help them secure employment. The programme offers the opportunity of long term mentorship to underpin long term success. We wish Dan and his team every success.

Buses 4 Homeless fitted with Zerio Plus wireless alarm panel and water mist extinguishers

Angie Dewick-Eisele

Director

Angie Dewick-Eisele is co-founder of Safelincs Ltd, one of the leading fire safety providers in the UK. Angie was Marketing Manager for many years and as Director is these days responsible for Content Management.

Double Awards for Safelincs

Safelincs receiving Employer of the Year 2019 East Lindsey Business Award

Safelincs Ltd have been named Employer of the Year and been given a second award for Excellence in Customer Service in the ELBA 2019 business awards. These two awards are testimony to the great team at Safelincs. Harry Dewick-Eisele, MD, said ‘We are incredibly proud of our team and these two awards are down to our great team work and ethical business practices’. He went on to say ‘we believe our success is in selecting the right staff from the start, giving them a comprehensive induction period and then involving them in all aspects of the business’.

 

Safelincs receiving Excellence in Customer Service 2019 East Lindsey Business Award

These two awards follow continued growth for the company, bucking the trend by growing 30% year on year for the last four years. Ensuring that staff are well trained, have a voice within the company and are empowered to provide the best customer service are all contributing factors for Safelincs’ success. With a product range of over 6000 products Safelincs can offer comprehensive fire safety solutions to customers of all sizes and work with organisations such as Eton College, Empire Cinema, the NHS, as well as schools, colleges and universities.

 

Angie Dewick-Eisele

Director

Angie Dewick-Eisele is co-founder of Safelincs Ltd, one of the leading fire safety providers in the UK. Angie was Marketing Manager for many years and as Director is these days responsible for Content Management.

How are fire doors rated?

Fire doors are given ratings which relate to the length of time the doors will give protection against a fire breaking through the door. Typial ratings for fire doors look like this: FD30, FD30s, etc. FD stands for fire door, and the number stands for the minutes of protection the door is certified for,  in this instance 30 minutes protection. The ‘s’ after the number rating indicates that the fire door has not only intumescent fire door seals but also brushes to prevent the spread of cold smoke.

Fire doors form an essential part of your fire protection plan, slowing down and compartmentalising a fire. As such, you must get the right fire door in the right place; after all, it could save lives.

If you would like to gain a deeper understanding of fire door ratings, read our article ‘Fire Door Ratings: FD30 or FD60?‘ to find out more. Alternatively our online fire door configurator will guide you seamlessly through the process of purchasing a fire door.

Angie Dewick-Eisele

Director

Angie Dewick-Eisele is co-founder of Safelincs Ltd, one of the leading fire safety providers in the UK. Angie was Marketing Manager for many years and as Director is these days responsible for Content Management.