Nest Product Generations – How to Identify Your Products

It is well known that electronic technology advances very quickly, with products being outdated and replaced by a newer version every year. More and more frequently these subsequent versions of the same product are being called ‘generations,’ such as a ‘5th gen iPod.’ Nest Labs’ range of ‘smart home’ products is no exception to this trend and the oldest two have already undergone a few iterations of redesign and improvement.

This guide has been written to help you quickly and easily identify which generation your Nest Products belong to.

Nest Protect

1st Generation 2nd Generation
Edges Straight Edges
Nest Protect 1st Generation Edges
Rounded Edges
Nest Protect 2nd Generation Edges
Backplate Square
Nest Protect 1st Generation Backplate
Circular
Nest Protect 2nd Generation Backplate
Battery Door No Battery Door
Nest Protect 1st Generation Battery Door
Battery Door
Nest Protect 2nd Generation Battery Door
Serial Number 05A or 05C
Nest Protect 1st Generation Serial Number
06A or 06C
Nest Protect 2nd Generation Serial Number

Model Number

Open the Nest app on your phone and tap Protect at the bottom, tap the Settings gear at the top followed by the alarm you’re interested in, and then go to Technical Info. If it says your model is Topaz-1.x then you have a First Generation, while Topaz-2.x denotes the Second Generation alarm.

Nest Learning Thermostat

2nd Generation 3rd Generation
Colours Stainless Steel Stainless Steel, Copper, Black, White
Appearance Nest Thermostat 2nd Generation Appearance Nest Thermostat 3rd Generation Appearance
  • 7cm screen diameter
  • 320 320px resolution
  • 8.25cm screen diameter
  • 480 x 480px screen
Base Nest Thermostat 2nd Generation Base Nest Thermostat 3rd Generation Base
  • Yellow spirit level
  • Rectangular Display connector
  • Blue spirit level
  • Oval display connector
Heat Link Nest Thermostat 2nd Generation Heat Link Nest Thermostat 3rd Generation Heat Link
  • One status light
  • 10cm height and width
  • 3 status lights
  • 11cm height and width

Nest Cam

Indoor Outdoor
Colour Black White
Appearance Nest Thermostat 2nd Generation Appearance Nest Thermostat 3rd Generation Appearance
Differentiating
Features
  • Securely stream 1080p video to your phone, tablet or laptop
  • Various positioning options
  • No installation – simply plug into power and set up via phone app
  • Compatible with standard camera mounts and tripods
  • Weatherproof camera nad cables
  • Magnetic mount with metal plate for wall attachment
  • Night vision
  • Clear 24/7 video with 130 degree viewing angle

What are Generations and do They Matter for Nest Products?

It is well known that computer-based technology advances very quickly, with products being outdated and replaced by a newer version, or ‘generation,’ almost every year. Nest Labs’ range of ‘smart home’ products is no exception to this as the oldest two have already undergone a few iterations of redesign and improvement.

Safelincs has a close relationship with Nest in the UK and gets its stock directly from them, so you can be assured that you’re buying the latest models. However, if you already own Nest products that may be older models you have nothing to worry about as there is no issue mixing new and old generations of Nest devices in your home.

Nest Protect
Nest Protect

The Nest Protect combines an industrial-grade smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector with voice alerts, status and testing via a smartphone app, and a range of extra features like a motion-sensing nightlight. With the second generation, you can even hush false alarms from the app.

The 2nd generation Nest Protect has been redesigned with a more curved and smooth profile, a clear difference from the 1st gen’s mostly square form. However, the new design isn’t just a prettier face; it has become an even more formidable guardian for your home as it is the first domestic smoke alarm to sport a ‘split-spectrum’ smoke sensor.

Utilising two frequencies of light, it can more accurately detect finer particles released by fast-flaming fires. The new Nest Protect also has a special wire mesh to decrease false alarms caused by dust or bugs. Furthermore, by changing the materials and components used in manufacturing, the 2nd gen Protect has a lifespan of 10 years compared to the 1st generation’s 7 years.

Nest Learning Thermostat

While the new Nest Learning Thermostat is a little slimmer than gen 2, the most noticeable difference is the much larger screen – 8.25cm vs 7cm – and they haven’t forgotten to increase the resolution to take advantage of this upgrade. Nest has also replaced the proximity sensor in the latest model which enables the thermostat to detect you across the room and wake up the screen, showing you the current time or temperature.

Some more functional updates in the 3rd generation involved not only upgrading the integrated WiFi chip, to support 5GHz for futureproofing against newer routers and to reduce dropped connections, but Nest also added support for OpenTherm. If your boiler supports this technology, the Nest Learning Thermostat can now help you manage your hot water as well as central heating.

If you do not recognise your Nest thermostat here, please visit https://nest.com/support/article/How-can-I-tell-which-Nest-Learning-Thermostat-I-have. You may have an older generation thermostat which was not made for compatibility with European systems.

Nest Cam
Nest Cam
The Nest Cam comes in two versions, Indoor and Outdoor, though both are on their first iteration so no matter where you see them or how long you’ve had one, it’s still the latest model. The black Indoor model is almost shaped like an inverted raindrop and has a noticeably slimmer and sleeker profile compared to its weatherproof brother, which appears more like a white coffee cup with no handle.

Regardless of which model you purchase you’ll get a bunch of great features like snapshots of activity over the last 3-hours, optional subscriptions for 10- or 30-day full video history, the ability to view live video from anywhere over the Internet, and 2-way voice communications between the Nest app and your Nest Cam. The only functional differences between the two are their mounting options and that the Outdoor model’s components are weatherproof.

To summarise, while Nest’s offerings have gone through a varying number of upgrades you can rest assured that, as long as you don’t accidentally purchase a first generation Learning Thermostat, all of your Nest gadgets will work together seamlessly. If you really want to have the latest models, though, Safelincs has you covered.
For any questions or to place an order you can call us on 0800 978 8202 or email support@safelincs.co.uk.

Safelincs introduces the Nest Protect Smart Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm

nest-protectTechnology moves fast and has finally reached the often ignored area of fire and gas detection. Smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms used to be standalone units, until the advent of interconnection. Once manufacturers had perfected hard-wired interconnection, allowing the alarms to communicate, the next step was wireless interconnection which made the whole process so much easier. But what is the latest step in smoke and CO alarm technology?

Safelincs is happy to introduce the all-new Nest Protect smart smoke and carbon monoxide alarm. Available in 230V mains and 9V battery powered versions, the Nest Protect combines an industrial-grade optical smoke sensor with a long-lasting carbon monoxide detector, making the 230V version the only mains powered combined smoke and CO alarm on the market. The Nest Protect is packed with features, including the ability to distinguish between smoke and steam to avoid false alarms and remote alerts via the Nest App. ‘Nightly Promise’ checks the power level of the alarm to ensure that there are no midnight chirps and the Nest Protect offers a handy Pathlight that lights your way during the night.

The Nest Protect can communicate with other Nest and Nest-compatible products, such as the Nest Learning Thermostat and the Nest Cam HD, giving you more control over your home and ensuring that you are safe and protected by the best technology!

If you have an questions or wish to place an order please ring 0800 612 6537 or visit http://www.safelincs.co.uk/nest/.

Introduction to the Dräger Parat C hood

draeger-parat-cThe Dräger Parat C is a fire escape hood that fully covers the head, providing 15 minutes of respiratory and eye protection from the toxic gases and fumes produced by fire. The Parat C can be purchased in four different versions; a standard single pack, a soft pack for easy storage, a traveller pack and a twin pack supplied in a wall mounted box.

The hoods are quick to deploy and easy to use, are supplied in one universal size suitable for all ages (including small children), and can be worn by persons with long hair, glasses or beards.

These fire hoods are used for the escape from buildings with long escape routes, are ideal for fire marshals and staff assisting other people to escape from buildings filling with smoke (e.g. teachers in schools). They can be used where smoke from a fire is affecting escape routes. Please note that the hoods will of course not protect you from fire or high temperatures, as the rest of the body is unprotected. If smoke is intense the user needs to move close to the floor where oxygen and cooler air are present.

The Dräger Parat C is fitted with a CO-P2 filter which will protect from the toxic gases shown below:

Chemical Name Description
CO Carbon Monoxide Produced by all fires as a component of smoke, caused by the improper burning of carbon fuels. CO is colourless, odourless and tasteless but highly toxic.Human senses cannot detect CO – symptoms include dizziness, headaches, nausea, stomach pains, breathing difficulties and eventually loss of consciousness.
HCN Hydrogen Cyanide Produced as a by-product of burning combustible everyday materials such as soft furnishings, insulation, clothing, etc. 20 times more toxic that CO. Targets the heart and brain and can incapacitate its victims within a short period of time.
H2S Hydrogen Sulfide Found predominantly in the oil and gas production industry, produced by decaying organic matter and characterised by its strong ‘rotten eggs’ odour. At high concentrations H2S can cause respiratory paralysis, asphyxial seizures and death.
N/A Particles Smoke is a collection of airborne solid and liquid particles, some of which can be highly toxic and cause poisoning when inhaled. When combined with the other by-products of a fire they can cause severe breathing difficulties, long-term illness, loss of consciousness and even death.

 

Watch this short introduction video showing how easy these hoods can be used.

Replacement of old Kidde smoke alarms

As well as testing your smoke and heat alarms on a regular basis, it is important to make a note of when the units actually need to be replaced. Studies have shown that the functionality of smoke and heat alarms can start to deteriorate when they reach a lifespan of 10 years. Each smoke and heat alarm should have a “replace by date” visible on the outside of the unit and we recommend that you adhere to this guideline.

When replacing a smoke alarm it can be quite difficult to recognise a suitable replacement product. In some cases, you may find that the current alarm model has been discontinued. With battery operated alarms, as there is no wiring in place, it is much easier to replace the unit for another smoke alarm with like-for-like features. Mains powered alarms are hard wired and are most likely interconnected during installation. It is because of this that finding replacement detectors can be difficult.

Working with Kidde Safety Europe, Safelincs are able to provide a list of mains powered discontinued Kidde smoke and heat alarms, along with their suitable product equivalents.

Discontinued Alarm Replacement Alarm
123/9HI KEKF10
123i KEKF10
123/9HILL KEKF10R
223/9HI KEKF20
223/9HILL KEKF20R
1275H KEKF10
323/9HI KEKF30
323/9HILL KEKF30R

The new alarms will interlink with other, still working units of the previously installed smoke alarms. This means that there is no need to replace all of the units within a system if only some of the installed detectors have reached the end of their recommended lifespan. All new mains powered smoke and heat alarms are provided with a mounting bracket and a wiring connector. It is important to note that you need to replace the existing mounting base and re-connect the wiring to fit the new units. With any mains powered alarms, all electrical work should be carried out by a qualified electrician.

Safelincs offer a smoke alarm reminder service which allows customers to be notified when their smoke and heat alarms are due to be replaced, when the batteries need to be changed and reminds customers to test their alarms on a regular basis. The service is completely free and customers can choose if they wish to be reminded by email, SMS text message or by Twitter.

Why should smoke alarms be replaced after ten years?

In 1992, the Building Regulations were amended requiring every new build to allow for mains-wired, interconnected smoke alarms to be installed. With many alarms installed under this Regulation still in use and potentially approaching their twentieth year, it was necessary to research a recommendation as to when mains powered smoke alarms should be replaced.

Current recommendations

  1. The majority of research found on this subject emanates from the US. The US National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) have issued NFPA Standard 72, National Fire Alarm and Signalling Code (2010 edition), which states:
    1. “Replace all smoke alarms, including those that use ten-year batteries and hard-wired alarms, when they are ten years old or sooner if they don’t respond properly when tested.”
  2. US fire safety websites, along with those in the UK, Canada, New Zealand and Australia, tend to recommend the replacement of domestic smoke alarms, whether battery or mains-wired, when they:
    • Fail to respond to tests
    • Are ten years old (varying between date of installation and manufacture)

Why Replace Alarms?

Several reasons are provided to justify the replacement of smoke alarms after ten years.

  1. The Minnesota Department of Public Safety cite a nationwide study undertaken by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which states that 97% of smoke alarms should still be functioning after one year, if supplied with power. After ten years it is 73%, whereas after 20 years, this figure stands at 54%. The study also indicated that 60% of the failures were due to flat or removed batteries or a disconnected power supply and the study offered possible reasons for this. Ageing alarms may experience sensitivity drifting, which may, in turn, result in an increased frequency of accidental activation and an increase in people removing the power supply It was thought that newer alarms with a ‘hush’ feature may contribute to remedying this
  2. An NFPA report cites a study undertaken by Canada’s Ontario Housing Corporation supporting the fact that 3% of smoke alarms will fail within one year. They also say that after 30 years, nearly all the alarms will have failed. They conclude that replacement after ten years, with roughly a 30% probability of failure, is an appropriate balance between safety and cost
  3. The South Australian Metropolitan Fire Service state that smoke alarm technology has improved significantly since legislation was introduced (similar requirements to the 1992 UK ones were introduced in Australia in 1995) and replacing old smoke alarms is an ideal opportunity to upgrade smoke alarm systems. The Australian Standard for smoke alarms (AS 3786) specifies an effective life of 10 years, suggesting that after that time effectiveness may be compromised with accumulated dust, insects, airborne contaminants and corrosion of electrical circuitry
  4. In the early 1990s, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission undertook an extensive study, called the National Smoke Detector Project, to examine smoke alarm ownership and operability. Some failures were found in smoke alarms, but there were no large or systematic problems identified with detector designs or manufacturing practices that cast any doubt on their long term reliability. However, a variety of component failures, corroded battery clips and deterioration and corrosion of the horn element contacts were found in a few smoke alarms
  5. Other reports from New Zealand and Canada looked at operability of battery smoke alarms, but no further reports on the operability and longevity of mains-wired smoke alarms could be found

Testing Smoke Alarms

  1. It should be noted that the regular testing of smoke alarms should help identify inoperability as testing a smoke alarm simulates smoke and does not simply test the power supply. This would indicate smoke alarm maintenance messages remain a priority. However, it was queried whether all smoke alarm test functions operate in this way, or whether some simply do test power supply, be it battery or mains-wired
  2. The general view from UK based smoke alarm manufacturers reflects the findings elsewhere. With contaminants such as dust, insects, grease and nicotine, the smoke alarm chamber is susceptible to becoming excessively sensitive or insensitive. This may lead to either an increase in nuisance false alarms, or to eventually becoming unable to detect smoke. One manufacturer reports that contamination is extremely variable, but that field experience indicated that 10 years is a reasonable compromise

Conclusion

  1. Evidence of smoke alarm longevity appears to be scarce and inconclusive. As with other electronic items, there will be failures in the units when they are produced and failures during their lifetime due to individual component faults. Similarly, as they get older more faults are likely to occur. Problems specific to smoke detectors include increased sensitivity
  2. In all the work identified so far, none has specifically concentrated on the failure of smoke alarms when they age. Smoke alarms do fail but the rate at which they do has not been accurately determined or related to their age.
  3. Despite there not being much research, it does seem appropriate to replace smoke alarms after ten years (in line with manufacturers advice), unless individual alarm testing suggests earlier replacement.

Mains-wired interconnected alarms – Replacement kits

  1. Safelincs has developed products designed to help facilitate the process of replacing the smoke detector heads for mains-wired interconnected smoke alarms

How Ei Optical Smoke Alarms Work

Optical sensors are more responsive to smouldering fires producing large particle smoke typical of fires involving furniture and bedding. They are more immune to invisible smoke produced by "burning the toast" and similar cooking fumes. this makes them ideal for siting in hallways close to kitchens where false alarms from ionisation alarms may be a particular problem. The BS 5839: Pt 6: 2004 recommends the use of optical alarms in circulation spaces of a dwelling, such as hallways and landings. Optical alarms are prone fo false alarms if exposed to steam and should not be located too close to poorly ventilated bathrooms or shower rooms.

Bafe Certified

  1. A light beam is pulsed in the sensor chamber every 10 seconds to "look" for smoke. Any smoke present has to be visible to the naked eye so that the receptor can "see" it. If no smoke is detected, the alarm woill remain in standby state.
  2. When large particles of smoke are detected, the light beam will be scattered onto the light receptor.
  3. This will then send an electrical signal to the IC (integrated circuit).
  4. This causes the alarm to sound.

Our Twitter competition has started!

Today marks the first day of our Twitter competition, where you have the chance to win 1 of 50 carbon monoxide alarms for your home. As a fire safety company and a Fire Kills partner, we know how important it is to promote and educate people about the dangers of smoke and other harmful gases in the home. Not only will you be able to learn a little something in our fire safety quiz, you will also be given the opportunity to sign up to our free smoke alarm reminders service, so you’ll never forget to change your batteries, test or replace your smoke alarm ever again!

As a thank you for your support in spreading this important message we are giving away a fantastic prize. Every day, for 25 days, two lucky winners will each receive a Kidde slimline digital CO alarm. Safelincs and Kidde have teamed up to provide these alarms that could potentially save your life.

The competition is now closed.

Celebrities pledge to test their smoke alarms every week

Celebrities from across the music, showbiz and sporting worlds are backing the Government’s Fire Kills campaign with a “Push It Pledge”, to urge people to test their smoke alarm every week.

Coronation Street on-screen sisters, Helen Flanagan and Brooke Vincent (aka Rosie and Sophie Webster), along with a host of other famous faces – including Amir Khan, Ainsley Harriet, Jill Halfpenny, Sir Terry Wogan, Darren Campbell, James Martin, Barry Cryer, Dave Spikey, Nihal and Bobby Friction – are all making a pledge to test their smoke alarm every week.  This is a vital step in helping the nation to reduce the number of deaths and injuries caused by accidental house fires.

Eighty five per cent of people own a smoke alarm, but worryingly less than a third test them every week.  This is despite the fact that you are more than twice as likely to die in an accidental house fire if you don’t have a working smoke alarm.

Safelincs is one of the partners of the government’s Fire Kills campaign and has developed a free service to remind people to regularly test their batteries and to change them each year. To register with this free service, just visit www.safelincs.co.uk/reminders

Sir Terry Wogan, who suffered a house fire himself, says: “I had a fire at home last year, and can vouch to the excellence of our local fire and rescue service, but if it hadn’t been for the smoke alarm, even they might have been too late to help, and the consequences could have been fatal for me and my family. I’ll make sure that my smoke alarm is tested weekly.”

Sir Ken Knight, the Government’s Chief Fire and Rescue Adviser says: “A smoke alarm can buy valuable time to escape from a fire, but only if it’s working properly. It’s not enough to just install smoke alarms in your home – you must test them every week. The main reason that smoke alarms fail to activate is missing or flat batteries – if the battery needs replacing, do this immediately.”

Test it, change it, replace it – it might save your life!

We are offering a new service, completely free of charge, that will remind households  to check that their smoke alarms are in working condition and will actually protect them in case of a fire.

This week the government’s Fire Kills campaign launched its new advertising series to promote fire safety in the home.  The focus of this year’s campaign is again on householders testing their alarms and replacing flat batteries. As stakeholders in the organisation, Safelincs are supporting this message with their new smoke alarm test reminder service.

Householders can register with the service and request notification by email or SMS when the next smoke alarm test is due.  You can decide the reminder frequency when registering with the service.  There are also options to request a reminder when the batterie needs replacing and the smoke alarm has come to the end of its useful life, which is usually after ten years.

To register with this free service, just visit www.safelincs.co.uk/reminders.

For their online customers, Safelincs have created further additions to this service. When you have placed an order with us, Safelincs offer to remind you about the regular tests your new fire safety equipment might require, e.g. the testing of your smoke alarms, the yearly service of your fire extinguishers, the regular testing of newly purchased emergency lighting ad more.

To benefit from this additional service, just order your fire safety equipment on www.safelincs.co.uk.