Sigma Smart+Shield – Deterring the Misuse of Emergency Exits

Emergency exits need to be accessible and easy top open, however, casual use of these exits can cause obvious problems, for example in shops and schools. The Smart+Shield Emergency Exit Alarm is designed to solve this problem.

Sigma Smart+Shield Emergency Exit AlarmThe exit alarm is fitted on or next to the exit door and sounds a very loud alarm if the door is opened un-authorised. The unit can be powered by either a 9V battery or from the mains. You can set the volume to either 75dB or 95dB and there’s also a delayed alarm setting, which will only sound if the door is left open – which is helpful for doors that need to be used regularly by authorised personnel. Following a door alarm activation the alarm can self-reset after either 30 or 180 seconds, or you can choose to activate it with the integrated keyswitch.  All Smart+Shields are also supplied with a fluorescent sticker that can be placed across the alarm, making it clear that the door is not for casual use.

ECSG950 Smart+Shield for panic bars in situThe base model of the Smart+Shield will work with any door when installed next to a magnetic contact (supplied with the alarm) on the door or the door frame. If you have installed panic bars you can mount the appropriate Smart+Shield behind the bar, increasing its impact as a visual deterrent.

The touch and panic bar models also have an extra feature: pre-alarm. They can sense slight pressure on the bar, starting a temporary alarm. If the bar is released then the alarm will silence itself, but will convert to a full alarm if the door is opened.

To place an order or find out more about the Smart+Shield visit our product listing. Alternatively you can contact our friendly sales and support staff by calling 0800 612 6537 or sending an email to support@safelincs.co.uk.

Daniel Bennett

Daniel Bennett

Product Administrator

Daniel is one of our product administrators. He has a wealth of knowledge when it comes to emergency lighting, fire alarms and smart products.

Latest Posts by Daniel Bennett

Sigma Smart+Shield – Deterring the Misuse of Emergency Exits19th April 2017

Project Shout launch 2017

This week sees Project Shout, a national awareness campaign highlighting the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning, launch its 2017 campaign.

Research carried out by Project Shout reveals that the suspected cases of CO (carbon monoxide) poisoning are ten times higher than previously thought. This means that a staggering 2500 cases of CO poisoning occur each year across England and Wales alone.

CO poisoning can have severe long term effects on health and causes around 50 deaths a year. Spreading awareness of the danger of this deadly gas is the ethos of Project Shout. Rob Lyon, campaign director for Project SHOUT, said: “These numbers are very concerning and highlight the fact that we need to do more to tackle the dangers of carbon monoxide and raise awareness of the symptoms.”

It is estimated that a staggering 40 million people are at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. This deadly gas cannot be smelt, seen or tasted. The only way to protect yourself is by having a CO alarm in your home. An alarm should be installed in every room where a fuel burning appliances is fitted. Carbon monoxide is produced from the incomplete combustion of a fossil fuel such as coal, gas, oil and wood.

Safelincs proudly supports Project Shout and is offering up to 33% discount on selected CO alarms. Make sure you are protected today.

Harry Dewick-Eisele

Harry Dewick-Eisele

Managing Director

MD and founder of Safelincs. Harry has a wealth of in-depth knowledge of all aspects of fire safety and related legislation.

Latest Posts by Harry Dewick-Eisele

Increasing global fire safety sales9th April 2017
Project Shout launch 201730th March 2017
Emergency Floodlights on External Escape Routes15th March 2017

Carbon monoxide awareness campaign on buses

dominic-rodgers-trust-logoSafelincs are proud to support the Dominic Rodgers Trust in their Christmas campaign, launching on December 12th 2016, to increase the awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning. The initiative that is being run through First buses across Huddersfield, Halifax and Leeds will see a special promotion on the back of their tickets, reaching 1.5 million people.

Dominic Rodgers was 10 years old when he died in 2004 from carbon monoxide that seeped through his bedroom wall from a neighbour’s faulty appliance. His mum, Stacey Rodgers, has been campaigning tirelessly since the tragic accident to raise awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Carbon monoxide (CO) has no smell, colour or taste and can only be detected by a CO alarm. As the symptoms of CO poisoning mimic those of flue, headache, dizziness and feeling nauseous, this campaign is very timely. The campaign offers travellers on First buses a 10% discount on a FireAngel carbon monoxide alarm.

Read more information about carbon monoxide poisoning.

Safelincs fundraising for CAPT

CAPT Child Accident Prevention TrustThis month CAPT (Child Accident Prevention Trust) are raising awareness about carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. CO, a gas that you can not see, smell or taste, can kill and is dubbed the ‘silent killer’.

Safelincs support CAPT in the great work that they do and we are pleased to announce the most recent donation of £554 this quarter. “This is another fantastic result and your generosity is much appreciated by all of us at the charity”, said Katrina Phillips, Chief Executive of the Child Accident Prevention Trust.

To protect your family and help raise funds for CAPT, purchase a FireAngel CO-9X or a CO-9D. A carbon monoxide alarm is the only way to detect CO, giving you the ability to leave your home and call for help. It could save your life.

Safelincs introduces the Nest Protect Smart Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm

nest-protectTechnology moves fast and has finally reached the often ignored area of fire and gas detection. Smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms used to be standalone units, until the advent of interconnection. Once manufacturers had perfected hard-wired interconnection, allowing the alarms to communicate, the next step was wireless interconnection which made the whole process so much easier. But what is the latest step in smoke and CO alarm technology?

Safelincs is happy to introduce the all-new Nest Protect smart smoke and carbon monoxide alarm. Available in 230V mains and 9V battery powered versions, the Nest Protect combines an industrial-grade optical smoke sensor with a long-lasting carbon monoxide detector, making the 230V version the only mains powered combined smoke and CO alarm on the market. The Nest Protect is packed with features, including the ability to distinguish between smoke and steam to avoid false alarms and remote alerts via the Nest App. ‘Nightly Promise’ checks the power level of the alarm to ensure that there are no midnight chirps and the Nest Protect offers a handy Pathlight that lights your way during the night.

The Nest Protect can communicate with other Nest and Nest-compatible products, such as the Nest Learning Thermostat and the Nest Cam HD, giving you more control over your home and ensuring that you are safe and protected by the best technology!

If you have an questions or wish to place an order please ring 0800 612 6537 or visit https://www.safelincs.co.uk/nest/.

Replacement of old Kidde smoke alarms

As well as testing your smoke and heat alarms on a regular basis, it is important to make a note of when the units actually need to be replaced. Studies have shown that the functionality of smoke and heat alarms can start to deteriorate when they reach a lifespan of 10 years. Each smoke and heat alarm should have a “replace by date” visible on the outside of the unit and we recommend that you adhere to this guideline.

When replacing a smoke alarm it can be quite difficult to recognise a suitable replacement product. In some cases, you may find that the current alarm model has been discontinued. With battery operated alarms, as there is no wiring in place, it is much easier to replace the unit for another smoke alarm with like-for-like features. Mains powered alarms are hard wired and are most likely interconnected during installation. It is because of this that finding replacement detectors can be difficult.

Working with Kidde Safety Europe, Safelincs are able to provide a list of mains powered discontinued Kidde smoke and heat alarms, along with their suitable product equivalents.

Discontinued Alarm Replacement Alarm
123/9HI KEKF10
123i KEKF10
123/9HILL KEKF10R
223/9HI KEKF20
223/9HILL KEKF20R
1275H KEKF10
323/9HI KEKF30
323/9HILL KEKF30R

The new alarms will interlink with other, still working units of the previously installed smoke alarms. This means that there is no need to replace all of the units within a system if only some of the installed detectors have reached the end of their recommended lifespan. All new mains powered smoke and heat alarms are provided with a mounting bracket and a wiring connector. It is important to note that you need to replace the existing mounting base and re-connect the wiring to fit the new units. With any mains powered alarms, all electrical work should be carried out by a qualified electrician.

Safelincs offer a smoke alarm reminder service which allows customers to be notified when their smoke and heat alarms are due to be replaced, when the batteries need to be changed and reminds customers to test their alarms on a regular basis. The service is completely free and customers can choose if they wish to be reminded by email, SMS text message or by Twitter.

CO or CO2 ?

A common source of confusion can be the difference between Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Carbon Dioxide (CO?). Both gases are colourless, tasteless and invisible, but the similarity ends there. We have put together the following guide to help you recognise the differences.

Key Characteristics:

CO–     Carbon Monoxide

Carbon Monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. CO can be produced by boilers, open fires and vehicles and is very toxic even at low levels. Detection of any level of CO warrants concern and the source should be identified as soon as possible.

In a residential setting Carbon Monoxide is the most pressing concern because levels as low 50ppm will harm you and just 700ppm (parts per million) can be life threatening. Initial symptoms of poisoning include headaches, nausea and breathlessness. The only way to detect CO is by installing a Carbon Monoxide Alarm.

CO?–   Carbon Dioxide

Carbon Dioxide can be produced in a variety of natural ways. CO? is a natural by-product of combustion and we all exhale it every day. It even has uses as diverse as giving drinks their fizz and extinguishing fires. Carbon Dioxide is not harmful in itself but an excess of CO? (above 3%) in an enclosed environment can lead to asphyxiation by reducing the level of oxygen available.

Carbon Dioxide detectors are usually used in commercial premises for example breweries or laboratories. Whilst CO? poisoning is something to be aware of it is unlikely to happen in a home environment.

As you can see, although their names are similar, the dangers posed by each gas are very different. It is important to be aware of the characteristics of each as they can both be harmful. The only way to be sure of staying safe is to make sure you have the appropriate detector fitted wherever you are.

Couple saved by CO alarm

This week, another CO alarm, supplied by Safelincs Ltd on behalf of Kirklees Council, detected a carbon monoxide leak that resulted from a faulty gas fire appliance. The CO alarm began to sound, prompting the occupants to act and call out a service engineer who confirmed the CO in the air.

The gas fire was condemned as it was found to be producing the odourless poisonous gas, which could have rendered the occupants unconscious and potentially could have killed them.

A carbon monoxide leak can cause at first flu like symptoms, tiredness and a general feeling of being unwell. When undetected it can lead to unconsciousness and eventually death.

Darlington Borough Council invest in CO Alarms

Housing Services at Darlington Borough Council has ordered a substantial number of CO alarms from Safelincs to supply their residents with this potentially life-saving equipment. The CO alarms are distributed by the Council’s Home Improvement Agency handypersons visiting households. Safelincs carried out the training of the staff with regards to siting, installation and maintenance of the carbon monoxide alarms.

CO gas (carbon monoxide) is an invisible and tasteless byproduct of the combustion processes, such as in gas boilers etc and can lead to headaches, flu like symptoms, loss of consciousness and even death. It is very important that households using any combustion processes for heating or cooking monitor the CO content of their homes with a carbon monoxide alarm, such as https://www.safelincs.co.uk/carbon-monoxide-detectors/

How Ei Optical Smoke Alarms Work

Optical sensors are more responsive to smouldering fires producing large particle smoke typical of fires involving furniture and bedding. They are more immune to invisible smoke produced by "burning the toast" and similar cooking fumes. this makes them ideal for siting in hallways close to kitchens where false alarms from ionisation alarms may be a particular problem. The BS 5839: Pt 6: 2004 recommends the use of optical alarms in circulation spaces of a dwelling, such as hallways and landings. Optical alarms are prone fo false alarms if exposed to steam and should not be located too close to poorly ventilated bathrooms or shower rooms.

Bafe Certified

  1. A light beam is pulsed in the sensor chamber every 10 seconds to "look" for smoke. Any smoke present has to be visible to the naked eye so that the receptor can "see" it. If no smoke is detected, the alarm woill remain in standby state.
  2. When large particles of smoke are detected, the light beam will be scattered onto the light receptor.
  3. This will then send an electrical signal to the IC (integrated circuit).
  4. This causes the alarm to sound.