Project Shout launch 2017

This week sees Project Shout, a national awareness campaign highlighting the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning, launch its 2017 campaign.

Research carried out by Project Shout reveals that the suspected cases of CO (carbon monoxide) poisoning are ten times higher than previously thought. This means that a staggering 2500 cases of CO poisoning occur each year across England and Wales alone.

CO poisoning can have severe long term effects on health and causes around 50 deaths a year. Spreading awareness of the danger of this deadly gas is the ethos of Project Shout. Rob Lyon, campaign director for Project SHOUT, said: “These numbers are very concerning and highlight the fact that we need to do more to tackle the dangers of carbon monoxide and raise awareness of the symptoms.”

It is estimated that a staggering 40 million people are at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. This deadly gas cannot be smelt, seen or tasted. The only way to protect yourself is by having a CO alarm in your home. An alarm should be installed in every room where a fuel burning appliances is fitted. Carbon monoxide is produced from the incomplete combustion of a fossil fuel such as coal, gas, oil and wood.

Safelincs proudly supports Project Shout and is offering up to 33% discount on selected CO alarms. Make sure you are protected today.

Harry Dewick-Eisele

Harry Dewick-Eisele

Managing Director

MD and founder of Safelincs. Harry has a wealth of in-depth knowledge of all aspects of fire safety and related legislation.

Latest Posts by Harry Dewick-Eisele

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Nest Product Generations – How to Identify Your Products

It is well known that electronic technology advances very quickly, with products being outdated and replaced by a newer version every year. More and more frequently these subsequent versions of the same product are being called ‘generations,’ such as a ‘5th gen iPod.’ Nest Labs’ range of ‘smart home’ products is no exception to this trend and the oldest two have already undergone a few iterations of redesign and improvement.

This guide has been written to help you quickly and easily identify which generation your Nest Products belong to.

Nest Protect

1st Generation 2nd Generation
Edges Straight Edges
Nest Protect 1st Generation Edges
Rounded Edges
Nest Protect 2nd Generation Edges
Backplate Square
Nest Protect 1st Generation Backplate
Circular
Nest Protect 2nd Generation Backplate
Battery Door No Battery Door
Nest Protect 1st Generation Battery Door
Battery Door
Nest Protect 2nd Generation Battery Door
Serial Number 05A or 05C
Nest Protect 1st Generation Serial Number
06A or 06C
Nest Protect 2nd Generation Serial Number

Model Number

Open the Nest app on your phone and tap Protect at the bottom, tap the Settings gear at the top followed by the alarm you’re interested in, and then go to Technical Info. If it says your model is Topaz-1.x then you have a First Generation, while Topaz-2.x denotes the Second Generation alarm.

Nest Learning Thermostat

2nd Generation 3rd Generation
Colours Stainless Steel Stainless Steel, Copper, Black, White
Appearance Nest Thermostat 2nd Generation Appearance Nest Thermostat 3rd Generation Appearance
  • 7cm screen diameter
  • 320 320px resolution
  • 8.25cm screen diameter
  • 480 x 480px screen
Base Nest Thermostat 2nd Generation Base Nest Thermostat 3rd Generation Base
  • Yellow spirit level
  • Rectangular Display connector
  • Blue spirit level
  • Oval display connector
Heat Link Nest Thermostat 2nd Generation Heat Link Nest Thermostat 3rd Generation Heat Link
  • One status light
  • 10cm height and width
  • 3 status lights
  • 11cm height and width

Nest Cam

Indoor Outdoor
Colour Black White
Appearance Nest Thermostat 2nd Generation Appearance Nest Thermostat 3rd Generation Appearance
Differentiating
Features
  • Securely stream 1080p video to your phone, tablet or laptop
  • Various positioning options
  • No installation – simply plug into power and set up via phone app
  • Compatible with standard camera mounts and tripods
  • Weatherproof camera nad cables
  • Magnetic mount with metal plate for wall attachment
  • Night vision
  • Clear 24/7 video with 130 degree viewing angle

Carbon monoxide awareness campaign on buses

dominic-rodgers-trust-logoSafelincs are proud to support the Dominic Rodgers Trust in their Christmas campaign, launching on December 12th 2016, to increase the awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning. The initiative that is being run through First buses across Huddersfield, Halifax and Leeds will see a special promotion on the back of their tickets, reaching 1.5 million people.

Dominic Rodgers was 10 years old when he died in 2004 from carbon monoxide that seeped through his bedroom wall from a neighbour’s faulty appliance. His mum, Stacey Rodgers, has been campaigning tirelessly since the tragic accident to raise awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Carbon monoxide (CO) has no smell, colour or taste and can only be detected by a CO alarm. As the symptoms of CO poisoning mimic those of flue, headache, dizziness and feeling nauseous, this campaign is very timely. The campaign offers travellers on First buses a 10% discount on a FireAngel carbon monoxide alarm.

Read more information about carbon monoxide poisoning.

Safelincs introduces the Nest Protect Smart Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm

nest-protectTechnology moves fast and has finally reached the often ignored area of fire and gas detection. Smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms used to be standalone units, until the advent of interconnection. Once manufacturers had perfected hard-wired interconnection, allowing the alarms to communicate, the next step was wireless interconnection which made the whole process so much easier. But what is the latest step in smoke and CO alarm technology?

Safelincs is happy to introduce the all-new Nest Protect smart smoke and carbon monoxide alarm. Available in 230V mains and 9V battery powered versions, the Nest Protect combines an industrial-grade optical smoke sensor with a long-lasting carbon monoxide detector, making the 230V version the only mains powered combined smoke and CO alarm on the market. The Nest Protect is packed with features, including the ability to distinguish between smoke and steam to avoid false alarms and remote alerts via the Nest App. ‘Nightly Promise’ checks the power level of the alarm to ensure that there are no midnight chirps and the Nest Protect offers a handy Pathlight that lights your way during the night.

The Nest Protect can communicate with other Nest and Nest-compatible products, such as the Nest Learning Thermostat and the Nest Cam HD, giving you more control over your home and ensuring that you are safe and protected by the best technology!

If you have an questions or wish to place an order please ring 0800 612 6537 or visit https://www.safelincs.co.uk/nest/.

New CO alarm legislation in Scotland for landlords

scottish-flagLandlords in Scotland are preparing for a new law that comes into power from the 1st of December regarding carbon monoxide (CO) detection in rented properties. The legislation is being introduced as part of the ‘repairing standard’ which governs the responsibilities of landlords in relation to basic standards of upkeep and safety.

The detection of carbon monoxide has now joined smoke detection on this list of duties, placing the responsibility for purchasing and installing CO detectors firmly in the hands of landlords. Those failing to provide CO detection are liable for referral to the Private Rented Housing Panel (PRHP) which has the authority to take action against landlords failing to comply.

This development has been welcomed by groups promoting CO safety, as statistics show that those living in privately rented accommodation are up to three times more likely to suffer from CO poisoning that those living in any other housing type.

Carbon monoxide is invisible, odourless and deadly. The only way to reliably detect CO presence is to install CO detectors. It is therefore predicted that the introduction of this law will help landlords to identify and resolve problems with their fuel burning appliances, which otherwise would have gone unnoticed.

FACO9X10Two important factors to note are that the legislation specifies all CO detectors supplied by landlords must feature a sealed, long-life battery, and that there should be a detector sited in every room containing a fuel burning appliance. Therefore it may be necessary to install more than one detector within a property and to replace detectors with changeable batteries already in place to comply with the regulations.

It should, however, be recognised that appliances used solely for the cooking of food are exempt from the legislation, but if a cooking appliance was to be in the same room as a fuel burning heating appliance, then that room would need to be covered by a detector.

A detailed guide to the legislation can be found within our Landlords and Fire Safety help section. However, if you need any assistance in relation to the new CO law, or any other aspect of fire safety, please feel free to contact our customer service team on who will be happy to help you purchase the most suitable products.

Project SHOUT launches today

project-shoutProject SHOUT, a campaign to raise awareness of carbon monoxide (chemical symbol CO) poisoning, launches today, September 7th 2015. We are proud to support this initiative and help spread the word about the silent killer – carbon monoxide.

Here are some of the facts: Tragically around 50 people die each year from carbon monoxide poisoning, 200 people require hospital treatment and a staggering 4000 people attend an A&E clinic with suspected CO poisoning. Yet there is still a lack of awareness of the dangers of CO.

How can we change these facts and figures? By spreading the awareness and knowledge that CO is a threat to anyone who has a fuel burning appliance in their home or lives in a home that is adjacent to a property with a fuel burning appliance.

CO is the result of ineffective burning of a carbon based fuel and it can leak into a home if flues are not working correctly or if, for example, gas burning appliances are faulty. Labelled as the silent killer carbon monoxide can not be detected by humans. It has no taste, smell or colour and can only be detected with the help of a carbon monoxide alarm.

Find out more about Project SHOUT. If you want to protect your family from the dangers of CO, take advantage of our special offer. For help and advice contact us on 0800 612 6537 or visit our carbon monoxide help pages.

Carbon Monoxide Danger on Holiday

Family vacationA recent ruling against a well-known holiday operator has again highlighted the very real dangers of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning for holidaymakers. The heartbreaking death of two young children on vacation with their family in Corfu occurred in October 2006. The return to prominence of this terrible and avoidable tragedy serves as a potent reminder of the risks of carbon monoxide whether at home or abroad.
Whilst general awareness of the threat posed by CO is rising, sadly most people simply fail to consider the issue when travelling. At home you are personally able to ensure that fuel burning appliances have been installed correctly and that they have been adequately maintained, however on holiday we rely on those managing the holiday accommodation to do this for us. Carbon monoxide is often cited as the most common cause of accidental poisoning. Children, babies and pregnant women are especially vulnerable, but everyone should take steps to protect themselves against the dangers of this invisible, odourless and lethal gas.
At high levels of exposure, carbon monoxide can kill within minutes. Just a single night’s sleep in proximity to a faulty boiler can prove fatal. The faulty appliance need not even be in the same room, as, frighteningly, CO is capable of reaching life threatening levels even when seeping through walls from adjacent areas.
The only way to ensure you are protected against this danger is to carry a portable CO alarm when travelling, and ensure it is active when you sleep. You may find advice elsewhere stating that colour changing dot type indicators are suitable to take on holiday, but this is simply not the case. People are by far at their most vulnerable when asleep, and these types of indicators cannot wake you in the event of carbon monoxide reaching dangerous levels whilst you sleep.
For as little as £13.67, you can ensure your family is safe from carbon monoxide poisoning throughout your holiday. Please make sure you add a carbon monoxide detector to your holiday checklist. It may be the most important thing you take with you.
For further information about the dangers of carbon monoxide and the symptoms you should look out for, please visit our CO information website.

Safelincs works with brain injury charity

Safelincs has formed a relationship with brain injury charity Headway to increase the awareness of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, to raise funds for the charity and to emphasise the importance of installing a CO alarm.

HeadwayLogoSafelincs has created a Headway branded subsite selling CO alarms linked to directly from the Headway main site. We fulfil the orders and for every alarm sold we donate £2 to the charity.

Headway was formed in 1979 to promote understanding of all aspects of brain injury and to provide information, support and services to people with a brain injury, their families and carers.

CO exposure can lead to anoxic brain injury because it binds very tightly to haemoglobin in the red blood cells and so reduces the amount of oxygen which can be carried in the bloodstream.

Carbon Monoxide is produced if there is not enough oxygen during the combustion process. It is commonly produced in appliances fuelled by Liquefied Petroleum Gas, natural gas, oil, petrol, wood or coal that have been badly fitted, are damaged, badly repaired or poorly maintained.

It is important that appliances are regularly maintained and to have a CO alarm installed. Fatalities have even been known to occur where the deadly gas has leaked from an adjoining property.

Safelincs also offers a dedicated information website to inform about carbon monoxide poisoning.

Gas Safety Week 10th – 16th September 2012

Gas Safety Week, co-ordinated by the Gas Safe Register, is a week-long event during which companies and organisations working within the industry promote gas safety.

Carbon monoxide, a poisonous gas produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, including natural gas, causes thousands of people every year to fall ill. It can be produced by faulty boilers, gas fires and cookers and, in the worst case, cause death by carbon monoxide poisoning.

As summer begins to fade and autumn takes its place, we start to switch on the central heating or light our fires. It is a good time of year to ensure that appliances are serviced and that chimneys and flues are swept. Carbon monoxide can be produced by an open coal or wood fire if the chimney is not drawing the smoke out of the room efficiently.

As symptoms for carbon monoxide poisoning are very similar to those of flu, it is possible for the presence of this gas to go undetected. If you have headaches and/or feelings of nausea and drowsiness, it may be due to the inhalation of carbon monoxide fumes. One of the simplest ways to protect yourself and your family is to install a carbon monoxide alarm in each room where there is a fossil fuel burning appliance. Carbon monoxide alarms sell for as little as £12.99 ex VAT . They will be triggered by the presence of carbon monoxide above 50ppm (parts per million) in the atmosphere.

On hearing your carbon monoxide alarm sound, you should open all windows and turn off the appliances that use fossil fuel. If the appliance is a gas burning device, contact the gas board and inform them of the situation. They will be able to confirm if there is carbon monoxide present and advise you on what to do next. If you were using an open fire at the point of alarm, ensure that you have swept the chimney  before relighting it; if the alarm goes off again, you may need to contact your local builder to ensure that there are no problems with the integrity of your chimney.

Visit Carbonmonoxideinfo.co.uk for useful information on this gas, including real-life accounts of people’s experiences of it. To help prevent tragic deaths due to carbon monoxide poisoning, please spread the message this week to family and friends; and, if you have elderly neighbours, check that they are looking after their appliances and suggest that they install carbon monoxide alarms, too.

CO or CO2 ?

A common source of confusion can be the difference between Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Carbon Dioxide (CO?). Both gases are colourless, tasteless and invisible, but the similarity ends there. We have put together the following guide to help you recognise the differences.

Key Characteristics:

CO–     Carbon Monoxide

Carbon Monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. CO can be produced by boilers, open fires and vehicles and is very toxic even at low levels. Detection of any level of CO warrants concern and the source should be identified as soon as possible.

In a residential setting Carbon Monoxide is the most pressing concern because levels as low 50ppm will harm you and just 700ppm (parts per million) can be life threatening. Initial symptoms of poisoning include headaches, nausea and breathlessness. The only way to detect CO is by installing a Carbon Monoxide Alarm.

CO?–   Carbon Dioxide

Carbon Dioxide can be produced in a variety of natural ways. CO? is a natural by-product of combustion and we all exhale it every day. It even has uses as diverse as giving drinks their fizz and extinguishing fires. Carbon Dioxide is not harmful in itself but an excess of CO? (above 3%) in an enclosed environment can lead to asphyxiation by reducing the level of oxygen available.

Carbon Dioxide detectors are usually used in commercial premises for example breweries or laboratories. Whilst CO? poisoning is something to be aware of it is unlikely to happen in a home environment.

As you can see, although their names are similar, the dangers posed by each gas are very different. It is important to be aware of the characteristics of each as they can both be harmful. The only way to be sure of staying safe is to make sure you have the appropriate detector fitted wherever you are.