Safelincs have student for one week work experience

This week Daniel, a student from Queen Elizabeth Grammar School, Alford, came to Safelincs for his work experience. Daniel got an overview of what the world of business is like and how each of our departments works together to create a successful business.

Daniel shadowed various departments such as HR, Sales, Products, IT and Marketing and carried out meaningful tasks in each area.  For example, in the products department Daniel was shown the product selection and listing processes and then completed a new product listing for an Evac+Chair Photoluminescent Sign. This experience showed him first-hand how a product is listed. Daniel said, ‘It was very useful to see how products that we take for granted actually become available to us.’

We ensured that Daniel’s placement at Safelincs was as interesting as possible. Throughout the week, Daniel was given a number of tasks typical for each department he visited. This included replying to mock customer emails, research tasks, such as finding an asbestos awareness course that met specific requirements, website evaluations on the Safelincs website and printing a new staff badge.

Overall, this has been a beneficial experience for not only Daniel but for us at Safelincs as well. Having students here opens up possibilities of future employment.  Daniel was a great student and we wish him every success in the future.

The product listing Daniel completed during his work placement week

Angie Dewick-Eisele

Marketing Manager

Angie has been our marketing manager since joining in 2002. She also has a keen interest in H&S issues.

Latest Posts by Angie Dewick-Eisele

Fire Exits: 10 Things Businesses Should Know19th April 2021
A Guide to Fire Safety in Offices26th February 2021
Lighting the Way – Emergency Lighting Requirements18th February 2021

Dorgard Retainers Hold Open Fire Doors Safely in Educational Premises

University of London College HallWithin schools, colleges and other education buildings there are always a lot of people moving around, especially at the start of lectures or break times. Often they are laden down with books and files and opening fire doors along the route, from one part of the building to another, can be a big problem. The issue of opening heavy fire doors also impacts on the independent mobility of disabled students.

In situations like this, some people will find a ‘solution’, like wedging a fire door open or using an extinguisher to hold the door open. They may not be aware that this action puts them and everyone else in the building in danger and that it is in fact illegal. Buildings like schools and colleges are compartmentalised to prevent the spread of fire through the building, gaining valuable time to escape. Fire doors are part of this compartmentalisation system and by wedging them open they are rendered inactive and will not be able to offer the protection they were designed for. Wedging fire doors open is therefore a serious breach of fire safety legislation and could lead to the head of the college, school or university being prosecuted, fined or even imprisoned.

The Dorgard Fire Door Retainer offers here a safe and legal solution. It is a fire door holder that, once fitted to the door, will hold it open in any position chosen. It then ‘listens’ for the fire alarm and upon hearing it, will release the door allowing doors fitted with a closer to close automatically. It offers free access without compromising fire safety. The installation of a Dorgard takes less than 10 minutes and can be carried out by any DIY person.

Dorgard can offer you a cost effective solution to legally hold your fire doors open too. University of London’s College Hall have already made the switch and are enjoying greater access throughout their building with the peace of mind that safety is still paramount and that their fire doors will close in the event of a fire.

“The Dorgard offers a low energy automatic door solution that proved to be the most cost effective way of improving access and independence for wheelchair users.” – University of London’s College Hall