Emergency Floodlights on External Escape Routes

Emergency Floodlight with PIR SensorSafelincs are delighted to announce the introduction of an innovative new product – the Emergency LED Floodlight with additional PIR Motion-Activation. This evolution of a standard emergency floodlight has numerous benefits and is proving popular with owners and operators of public and commercial buildings.

The one feature universally required when specifying an emergency floodlight to cover a final exit is that it illuminates the area when most needed, i.e. in the event of an evacuation. By combining a PIR (passive infrared) sensor with a high quality external grade emergency floodlight, this product ensures that a final exit or entrance is never left dark when people are exiting the building. The floodlight will come on the moment people are leaving the building or approaching it. It will, of course, also come on in the event of a power failure and will the illuminate the area for a full three hours, powered by its internal backup battery.

But why not have a light on all of the time you may ask? This is not always advisable, as neighbouring properties could be adversely impacted by light pollution, and of course the running costs of a maintained (always on) emergency floodlight are considerable.

This makes the motion sensor activated emergency LED floodlight not only the most dependable emergency floodlight on the market, but also one of the most cost effective to run. The nature of the product means that the light is only ever on when required, and this feature, combined with the use of energy efficient LED light fittings makes this product environmentally friendly and financially sensible.

If you are installing or replacing an emergency floodlight, then look no further. This is the product for you. For more details about this money-saving weatherproof external floodlight with PIR, visit our brand new product listing or give us a call on 0800 612 6537.

Harry Dewick-Eisele

Harry Dewick-Eisele

Managing Director

MD and founder of Safelincs. Harry has a wealth of in-depth knowledge of all aspects of fire safety and related legislation.

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Helpful new video about emergency lighting terms

emergency-light-exitEmergency lighting is essential in most businesses, providing an immediate secondary source of light in the event of a power failure. When selecting emergency lighting you will, however, come across confusing terms such as maintained, non-maintained and switchable emergency lights. Our short video explains the differences in an easily understood way.

Safelincs also offers other guides about emergency lighting:

Our friendly staff are always happy to help you with your emergency lighting planning.
Please email support@safelincs.co.uk

 

How Ei Optical Smoke Alarms Work

Optical sensors are more responsive to smouldering fires producing large particle smoke typical of fires involving furniture and bedding. They are more immune to invisible smoke produced by "burning the toast" and similar cooking fumes. this makes them ideal for siting in hallways close to kitchens where false alarms from ionisation alarms may be a particular problem. The BS 5839: Pt 6: 2004 recommends the use of optical alarms in circulation spaces of a dwelling, such as hallways and landings. Optical alarms are prone fo false alarms if exposed to steam and should not be located too close to poorly ventilated bathrooms or shower rooms.

Bafe Certified

  1. A light beam is pulsed in the sensor chamber every 10 seconds to "look" for smoke. Any smoke present has to be visible to the naked eye so that the receptor can "see" it. If no smoke is detected, the alarm woill remain in standby state.
  2. When large particles of smoke are detected, the light beam will be scattered onto the light receptor.
  3. This will then send an electrical signal to the IC (integrated circuit).
  4. This causes the alarm to sound.