Emergency Floodlights on External Escape Routes

Emergency Floodlight with PIR SensorSafelincs are delighted to announce the introduction of an innovative new product – the Emergency LED Floodlight with additional PIR Motion-Activation. This evolution of a standard emergency floodlight has numerous benefits and is proving popular with owners and operators of public and commercial buildings.

The one feature universally required when specifying an emergency floodlight to cover a final exit is that it illuminates the area when most needed, i.e. in the event of an evacuation. By combining a PIR (passive infrared) sensor with a high quality external grade emergency floodlight, this product ensures that a final exit or entrance is never left dark when people are exiting the building. The floodlight will come on the moment people are leaving the building or approaching it. It will, of course, also come on in the event of a power failure and will the illuminate the area for a full three hours, powered by its internal backup battery.

But why not have a light on all of the time you may ask? This is not always advisable, as neighbouring properties could be adversely impacted by light pollution, and of course the running costs of a maintained (always on) emergency floodlight are considerable.

This makes the motion sensor activated emergency LED floodlight not only the most dependable emergency floodlight on the market, but also one of the most cost effective to run. The nature of the product means that the light is only ever on when required, and this feature, combined with the use of energy efficient LED light fittings makes this product environmentally friendly and financially sensible.

If you are installing or replacing an emergency floodlight, then look no further. This is the product for you. For more details about this money-saving weatherproof external floodlight with PIR, visit our brand new product listing or give us a call on 0800 612 6537.

Harry Dewick-Eisele

Managing Director

MD and founder of Safelincs. Harry has a wealth of in-depth knowledge of all aspects of fire safety and related legislation.

Magnetic Locks on Fire Exits

Ensuring that unwanted persons are kept out of your building without jeopardising a rapid fire escape from the inside of the building can be difficult. Panic bars are really only suitable for additional fire exits rather than the main entry points of a building. Magnetic locks (also called maglocks or mag locks) can offer here a solution.

maglocksMagnetic locks use a strong, electrically powered electromagnet to hold the door closed. If the power fails, or is interrupted by a fire alarm signal, the magnet loses power and releases the door which can then be opened. The door can usually only be released by pressing a button on the INSIDE of the building, although external keypad overrides are available.

We have launched a range of magnetic access control kits from Deedlock that not only keep out uninvited guests, but also link-up with fire detection units to release doors in the event of a fire. These kits are ready to be installed by any electrician.

Magnetic door lock kits can include the following release methods: key fobs and card reader units, release switches, digital keypads and emergency break-glass units. And of course the maglocks can be released automatically by a fire alarm system in case of fire. The maglock devices are powered by a 12V power supply.

For a range of other access door control equipment, take a look at our exit door security range.

Fire drills in schools

As part of the annual health and safety audit that schools have to complete the subject of fire safety will arise. Questions about the maintenance of fire extinguishers and smoke alarms as well as other equipment will need to be assessed. Are the annual checks up to date and are regular visual checks carried out throughout the year?  Along side this the procedure for fire drills will also be reviewed.

Most schools are very good at carrying out fire drills on a regular basis but do the drills go far enough to be useful to highlight any difficulties that may occur in the event of a real fire? The usual procedure for a fire drill is to set off the alarm system and evacuate the children out of the building as quickly as possible. This is good practice and familiarises both pupils and staff with the routine but where is the fire situated from which they are evacuating?

These common fire drills do not take into account that one or more exits may be blocked in the event of a real fire and that an alternative route may need to be used. Teachers who have always used the same exit door in a drill may panic if this exit is blocked by a real fire and may not be able to lead the pupils to safety.  It is essential that different exits are blocked in a drill to ensure that it is second nature for the teachers and pupils to use an alternative route.

A fire drill where an exit is blocked may highlight that in actual fact there is only one escape route and that a window may then need to be utilised as exit point. If the window is double glazed and does not open fully it may be necessary to have an emergency escape hammer fitted near the window. If the room is not on the ground floor there may be a need to install an external fire escape ladder.

Increase the scope of your next fire drill and simulate a fire blocking an exit point. It can be as simple as someone standing at the exit door waving their arms saying “this exit is blocked by fire”.