Firework safety

fireworksRoSPA, the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents is campaigning for an increase in awareness of the dangers created by setting off fireworks.

Fireworks look magical but we must remember that they are made from explosives and are therefore dangerous. Even innocent products, such as sparklers, get five times hotter than cooking oil and if you were to put three sparklers together they would generate the same heat as a blowtorch.  A fireworks rocket can reach speeds of up to 150mph; imagine the impact it would have if it were to hit a person at this speed.

The majority of injuries caused by fireworks are to hands, followed by eyes and face. It is important that everyone adheres to the firework code. Educating children and young people in the correct handling of fireworks can prevent injuries from happening, as most injuries happen to under 17 year olds.

To reduce the risk from fireworks, consider the recommendations of the Firework Code:

– Only buy fireworks that comply with BS 7114 British Standard
– Don’t drink alcohol if you’re setting off fireworks
– Keep fireworks in a closed box
– Follow the instructions for each firework
– Stand well back
– Never go near a firework that has been lit – if it hasn’t gone off, it could still explode
– Never throw fireworks or put them in your pocket
– Always supervise children around fireworks
– Light sparklers one at a time and wear gloves
– Never give sparklers to children under five years old
– Keep pets indoors

Burns can scar for life. Make ensure you have a burns kit at the ready should an injury occur. A water mist extinguisher will quickly quench any fire and can even be used on clothing. The microscopic droplets of water from the extinguisher form a cooling mist over the fire and smother the oxygen, extinguishing the fire.

Be safe, Be prepared

Bonfire Night – stay safe and have fun!

Bonfire NightIt’s that time of year where many of us will be looking forward to the celebrations of Bonfire Night. The tradition of wrapping up warm, toffee apple supper, sparklers, bonfire glow and spectacular firework displays all combine to bring crowds of people together, in awe of the decorative night sky that lies ahead.
Although public, organised events are the safest way to enjoy the festivities, many choose to have an intimate, family get-together and celebrate at home. Whatever you choose to do this Bonfire Night, remember to follow these simple safety guidelines from The Firework Code:
– Only buy fireworks that comply with BS 7114 British Standard
– Don’t drink alcohol if you’re setting off fireworks
– Keep fireworks in a closed box
– Follow the instructions for each firework
– Stand well back
– Never go near a firework that has been lit – if it hasn’t gone off, it could still explode
– Never throw fireworks or put them in your pocket
– Always supervise children around fireworks
– Light sparklers one at a time and wear gloves
– Never give sparklers to children under five years old
– Keep pets indoors
Last year, nearly 1000 injuries were caused by fireworks in October and November, with almost half of that figure being children. Don’t spoil your evening with unnecessary injury – stay safe and have fun!
To celebrate Bonfire Night, Safelincs are running a limited time special offer on selected fire safety and first aid products. Make sure you’re prepared and keep your family safe. Act responsibly and enjoy your evening.

Stay safe this bonfire night

Bonfire night is a historical tradition in Britain dating back to 1605 when Guy Fawkes and 12 other men conspired to blow up the houses of parliament. It is a celebration that many of us enjoy with family and friends, traditional food such as toffee apples, treacle toffee and parkin as well as a bonfire and fireworks. For many this celebration will become something that they remember for the rest of their lives, but not because of the fun they had. Hundreds of children and adults will be scared for life due to injuries caused by fireworks.

It is a great worry when public figures like Man City’s Mario Balotelli use fireworks in a dangerous manner. He is a role model for many young children, who emanate the actions of such public figures. It is a hard enough problem to tackle without having to counter balance such actions from famous role models.

One of the safest ways to enjoy bonfire night is to attend an organised event. The bonfire and fireworks are usually a safe distance from the spectators and those who are  setting light to the fireworks are responsible people.

If you are having a bonfire at home be aware of the dangers and how to make it a safe event.  If you are giving your children sparklers  ensure that they wear gloves and never let them pick up a sparkler that has been dropped. Sparklers can get up to six times hotter than a pan of cooking oil. When the sparkler has finished place it into a bucket of water.  Always supervise children when they are using sparklers and ensure that they keep them at arms length and away from others.

Keep fireworks out of reach from children and in a metal box to prevent them getting accidentally ignited. Never return to a firework that has not gone off.  Always act in a sensible manner around fireworks and never throw them at anyone, hold them in your hand when lighting them or put them into the bonfire. Walk away if anyone acts in an irresponsible manner, what may seam like fun could end with life long scars.

Ensure that you know what to do in the event of a someone getting burnt. Have a first aid kit or burns kit at hand. Act quickly and where injuries are severe seek medical advice.

For further information on bonfire night safety visit http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/HomeAndCommunity/InYourHome/FireSafety/DG_064665

http://www.cbtrust.org.uk/newsevents/2010/FireworkSafety.shtml