Adding an extra dimension to fire safety

3D-PrintingSafelincs has broken the mould and become the first fire safety provider to offer free product templates for 3D printers. 3D printers allow three-dimensional objects to be printed easily and quickly in plastic or other compounds. The first products to be introduced are test keys for manual call points and emergency lighting systems. The regular testing of alarm and lighting systems is a core aspect of fire safety management within a business, and our free 3D models mean you can rapidly replace mislaid or broken test keys without having to wait for us to ship replacement keys to you.
The keys offer a simplified, yet functional design and are compatible with a range of common devices. The STL files needed to print these free 3D test keys are available to download directly from our website with no catch or conditions. Simply click download now, and then use the file to create your own test keys via your 3D printer.
As the UK’s most progressive and customer focused provider of fire safety solutions, Safelincs believes in engaging with new technologies for the betterment of the fire safety industry. Innovations such as service-free extinguishers and water mist technology have revolutionised the fire extinguisher market in recent years, and Safelincs have been at the forefront of this modernisation to offer the best quality and best value products to our customers.
We believe 3D printing will continue to grow in popularity and become a practical alternative when it comes to sourcing fire safety items, removing the need to wait for simple items to be delivered. As part of our commitment to combine best value with great service, Safelincs will continue to invest in the future of our industry and embrace new technologies for the benefit of our customers. Next time you need a test key for your alarm or emergency lighting system: print, don’t pay.

For customers who still want to purchase the Original Equipment Manufacturers’ test keys from us, we are of course still selling test keys.

Fire safety in offices

Office fire safety is often taken for granted by staff. When you spend so much of your day in an office, it is easy to forget the risks that are present. Office fires are rare, but they can be devastating when they do occur. The following reminders relate to fire safety actions affecting your staff. A detailed fire safety assessment of your own premises can be found in your company’s fire risk assessment, which is a legal document and looks at all the fire risks in your organisation and the remedial actions and structural fire safety provisions.

Fire Drills

Every member of staff must be made aware of where the nearest fire exits are and which routes to take when exiting the building. The best way of ensuring that all staff know the escape routes is to carry out regular fire drills.

To start the drill, sound the fire alarm system by triggering individual alarms or manual break points (every time from a different location). Then check that all your staff and visitors have arrived at the assembly points. For this purpose it is important that visitor books are filled in correctly and taken by the fire warden to the assembly point during the drill. A visitor having left the premises without signing out will cause you a lot of headache during fire drills!

During fire drills, simulate one or two of the fire exits being blocked by fire. Place a fire warden in front of the fire exits, turning back members of staff trying to leave through this exit. It is surprising how difficult staff find it to identify an alternative, safe escape route.

Record the trigger points being used to set off the alarm system and record the fire drill in your fire safety logbook. Any failings experienced during the drill must be recorded and acted upon swiftly.

Escape routes

Staff escaping a building must be visually directed to the safest and usually quickest route leading to the nearest fire exit. Ensure that photoluminescent (glow in the dark) fire escape route signs are indicating the nearest exit and are clearly visible. You need to ensure that even if the mains power fails, all escape route signs are visible and that stairs and awkward floors are lit sufficiently to escape safely. You can achieve this by installing emergency lights or by installing illuminated fire exit signs in the first place.

Fire Extinguishers in offices

Portable fire extinguishers can be very valuable in stopping small fires getting out of hand and turning into large fires which threaten lifes, property and even the business’ survival. However, if fire extinguishers are used incorrectly or if the fire is too large to be extinguished safely, staff might get injured and fires might still get out of hand. Train your staff in the correct use of extinguishers. Where possible reduce the number for different fire extinguisher types to a minimum to avoid confusion. The new dry water mist fire extinguisher development allows to have just one extinguisher type covering most fire risks in an office. The application of this extinguisher type is also very safe and simple.

Ensure that you cover all risk areas with fire extinguishers. Ensure that your extinguishers were commissioned by a service engineer at your premises and are maintained in accordance to British Standards. Please note that where self-maintenance extinguishers are installed, a yearly visual inspection by your staff is still required and must be documented in your fire safety log book.

In addition, your own staff representatives must visually inspect all your extinguishers on a regular base to ensure that the extinguishers are not damaged in between the yearly maintenance visit or even empty.

Manual Call Points (MCP)

Make sure that all employees understand that the first thing to do if they discover a fire is to press the nearest manual call point (also called manual break points). This alerts all of your staff of the fire. New staff must be shown the call points during their induction period. Fire action signs help to re-inforce the correct behaviour in case of a fire.

Where office buildings are shared with other companies, make sure that a system exists of notifying all the companies in the building if there is a fire.