Passive fire protection

Passive fire protection slows down the spread of fire and contains the fire. Examples of passive fire protection products are: pipe wraps, fire door seals, intumescent sprays and many other products.

In the Passive fire Protection guide, which can be found in our advice section on our website, you will find guidance on what measures you can take to prevent the spread of fire in a domestic building.

Advice for students

University students usually move from living at home into halls of residents or rented accommodation. Finding yourself responsible for your own safety, and of course fire safety,  for the first time can be daunting. We have developed a fire safety advice section on our website to help with most relevant areas of fire safety in general.

One of the guides, ‘Advice for students‘  will give students guidelines on what to look out for as a student regardless of whether you are living in rented accommodation or halls of residence.

Do you comply?

All too often we hear of prosecutions where companies or landlords, amongst other people, are prosecuted due due breaches of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005.

It can be very confusing knowing what is expected of you and what fire precautions you should implement. We have developed a section of our website to provide useful information to our customers. In our Fire Safety Advice section you will find many guides to help you understand what is expected of you.

A good guide to start with is our Do you comply? guide which will help you understand what is expected of you as competent person.

Safelincs to supply the Church of England buying platform

The Church of England has a central collaborative purchasing platform, Parish Buying, providing a wide range of products ranging from office supplies to energy contracts to over 14000 C of E churches, schools and community groups. One of the product ranges is fire safety and Safelincs is proud to have won the tender for the supply of all fire safety products and services, as well as all health & safety (H&S) supplies.

Church organisations benefit from substantially discounted prices and strong customer support. Some of our product ranges offer unique benefits not available from other suppliers. One example is the new Fireworld extinguisher range which is guaranteed for ten years and does not require maintenance through external engineers. These extinguishers, which have been approved by the Ecclesiastical Insurance Group, will allow C of E groups to save substantial amounts over the years.

More information about the buying portal can be found on Parish Buying

Tragic death of father and two children due to carbon monoxide

The tragic death of Trevor Wallwork and his two children, Kim aged 12 and Harry aged 9 is thought to have been due to carbon monoxide poisoning.

The three were found dead in the living room of their home in Co Silgo on December 18. It is thought that a crisp packet that had been put on the open fire was sucked up and blocked the chimney causing the deadly gas to seep into the room.

Their sad deaths highlight how dangerous carbon monoxide is. It is unthinkable that an innocent act of putting a crisp packet on an open fire could have such devastating consequences. If you are unsure what the signs and symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are or would like to find out more here is some information for you.

What is Carbon Monoxide?

Carbon Monoxide (chemical symbol: CO) is a colourless, odourless, tasteless and toxic gas created by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels (gas, oil, coal and wood), as used in our everyday appliances such as heaters, engines and boilers.

Symptoms

The symptoms of mild Carbon Monoxide poisoning are similar to those of viral cold infections: headache, nausea, dizziness, sore throat and dry cough.

More severe poisoning can result in a fast and irregular heart rate, over-breathing (hyperventilation), confusion, drowsiness and difficulty breathing. Ultimately it leads to coma and death.

How to protect yourself and your family

  • Make sure rooms and heaters are well ventilated.
  • Have your chimneys and flues checked regularly.
  • Make sure boilers and heaters are maintained and serviced regularly.
  • A Carbon Monoxide Detector will measure the concentration of Carbon Monoxide in a room and sound an alarm if the CO concentration is higher than permitted (as indicated below)

Here is the full report  http://www.independent.ie/national-news/tragic-victims-of-carbon-monoxide-poisoning-returned-to-uk-2981516.html