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Frequently Asked Questions

Below are a collection of commonly asked questions we receive from our UK visitors. If you need any further help or advice, please do not hesitate to contact us and we'll be happy to help. Please note that the answers apply only to our UK customers.

Fire Escape Ladders

Smoke Alarms

Fire Extinguishers

Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Emergency Lighting

Fireproof Boxes, Fire Safes and Datasafes

Firedoors

Other Products

Purchases and Delivery

Shopping Process

Returns Policy

Bulk Orders

Fire Escape Ladders

Q: I have a very deep window sill. Do all your escape ladders fit?

A:Some models, such as Kidde and http://www.safelincs.co.uk/saf-escape-fire-escape-ladder/Saf-Escape ladders will only fit specific wall thicknesses and limited window sill depth. Other models, such as Kletter-Fix and Easiscape escape ladders are independent from the window sill or wall thickness.

The Kidde fire escape ladder is suitable for a wall thickness of up to 11 inches.

The Saf-Escape ladders are sold in three versions: for walls not thicker than 10 inches, for walls with 10 to 14 inches thickness and for walls with 14 to 18 inches thickness.

The Kidde fire escape ladder is suitable for a wall thickness of up to 11 inches.

The Rollo Roll-out fire escape ladder has adjustable hooks for wall thickness up to 20 inches.

The X-It fire escape ladder has also adjustable hooks for wall thickness up to 20 inches.

If you need escape ladders for even thicker walls, please inform us by e-mail at support@safelincs.co.uk.

Q: My window sill has not got a lip or overhang. Does this matter?

A: No. None of the ladders requires an overhang of the sill, neither on the inside nor the outside, as the ladders should locate against the wall and the top of the sill, only.

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Q: I have a radiator underneath the window sill. Can I still use your ladders?

A: Our Kletter-Fix mobile escape ladders only require space for the special wall-mounted steel bar to be screwed to the wall. The ladder is then hooked to this bar in an emergency. The bar can be fitted underneath the window sill or above the window, as long as the masonry is sound.

The Kidde and the Saf-Escape ladders only require about one inch of space underneath the window sill.

The X-It and the Rollo escape ladders can clamp over the radiator

The Easiscape ladder is clipped into eyebolts which can be fitted underneath the radiator

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Q: My window sill is unsound. Can I still use your ladders?

A: The Kletter-Fix mobile escape ladders require a bar to be fitted on the inside below or above a window. It is therefore very important that the masonry is sound. The window sill is only required as a handhold and to straddle while you are climbing out of the room onto the ladder. If in doubt please contact your builder.

The Kidde and Saf-Escape ladders are hooked over the window sill with large hooks resting against the inside wall and the outside wall. This means that the window sill itself does only take a vertical load and will not slip as long as the hooks are placed correctly and the wall itself is sound..

Please ensure that the wall is of sound structure and follow the written instructions supplied with each ladder.

Never hook the ladder hook-ends over the frame of the window, only!

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Q: I have a Velux window. Which ladder can you recommend?

A: The best suited products are the Rollo Roll-Out fire escape ladder and the Easiscape ladder. Both ladders are rolled up in a fire retardantbacking sheet and can be deployed easily and quickly over a sloping roof.

Both the Kidde and the Kletter-Fix escape ladders are not suitable for Velux windows

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Q: I have a Dormer window. Which ladder can you recommend?

A: The best suited products are the Rollo Roll-Out fire escape ladder and the Easiscape ladder. Both ladders are rolled up in a fire retardantbacking sheet and can be deployed easily and quickly over a sloping roof.

Both the Kidde and the Kletter-Fix escape ladders are not suitable for Velux windows

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Q: Are the ladders safe for children?

A: Portable escape ladders: Children should only use the ladders under adult supervision. The supervising adult should usually exit first to stabilise the ladder with his weight and to be able to help the child onto the ladder. Very small children need to be carried in a baby carrier (in front of chest)

The SaffoldModum external foldout fire escape ladders are very safe to use for children from apprx. school age and can be used in conjunction with an escape harness, which prevents accidental falling.

Please note that all fire escape devices must not be used for any other purpose than an emergency exit.

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Q: Where can I store the ladder?

A: The Saf-escape, Kidde, Rollo, X-It and Kletter-Fix escape ladders are stored in cardboard boxes. They can be stored under a bed or on top of a wardrobe. Please ensure that children have no unsupervised access to the escape ladder!

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Q: Can I practise the escape routine?

A: The Saf-escape ladders can be fully tested and in actual fact must be installed at least once to assemble the standoffs in the relevant positions. However, test the ladder at this point by standing on the bottom rung to test the soundness of the anchorage first. There are clear instructions provided with the ladder to show how the ladder must be re-packed after a test to ensure the perfect application of the ladder in an emergency.

We do not recommend that you test the Kletter-Fix ladders as they are quite difficult to re-pack. They should only be hooked onto their fixing bar to familiarise yourself with the use of the ladder. If you do deploy a Kletter-Fix ladder please ensure you re-pack the ladder afterwards according to the instructions.

The Kidde escape ladder can only be tested by placing the hooks over the window sill. The velcro strap securing the pack of rungs must not be undone. Otherwise any warranty for the product becomes invalid. This is to ensure that in the case of emergency the ladder unfolds perfectly.

The Rollo Roll-Out fire escape ladder can be fully tested. The ladder has to be rolled-up carefully after use to ensure that the backing sheet is correctly positioned. Please note that there is a risk of damage to the guttering and roof if you climb up or down this ladder if used from a Velux window or a dormer window.

The X-It fire escape ladder can also be tested. But as the segments lock into each other at deployment, it is not easy to pack away this ladder. Usually you will have to lower this ladder to the outside ground level to dis-engage the segments. Please note that there is a risk of damage to any protruding structures underneath the escape window when testing the ladder.

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Q: I have double-glazed windows that do not fully open. Can I still use your ladders?

A: You might if you can break the panes safely to escape. It is important to know that you must hit the corners of the pane to break a double-glazed pane. Never hit the centre of the pane, as the tool might bounce back and hurt you. You might want to keep a hammer or special tool available for this purpose. Obviously it is difficult to test your ladder under these circumstances, so special caution must be taken when choosing a ladder. Please note that we do not recommend the Kidde escape ladder for this applications as sharp glass fragments might damage the ropes or the fabric of this ladder.

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Q: My window only opens at the top. Can I use a fire escape ladder?

A: Only if you can break the bottom pane safely to escape. You might want to keep a hammer or special tool available for this purpose. It is important to know that you must hit the corners of the pane to break a double-glazed pane. Never hit the centre of the pane, as the tool might bounce back and hurt you. Obviously it is difficult to test your ladder under these circumstances beforehand, so special caution must be taken when choosing the best ladder. Please note that we do not recommend the Kidde escape ladder for this applications as sharp glass fragments might damage the ropes or the fabric of this ladder.

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Q: I would like to see your ladders before I purchase one. Where can I see one?

A: Please let us know where you live(support@safelincs.co.uk) and we will put you in contact with the nearest distributor. You can also order a ladder and return it to us within 14 days if you do not wish to keep it. Please note that you will have to pay for the return shipment cost. Your initial shipping charges will of course be refunded.

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Q: I have very limited space around the window. Which escape ladder do you recommend?

A: We would recommend the Easiscape ladder which only requires two eyebolts underneath the window to clip the ladder into.

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Q: I want to fit an escape ladder on a balcony or over a railing. What do you recommend?

A: Our Kletter-Fix mobile escape ladder can be hooked over the structurally sound railing of a balcony or any other sound railing.(max width 70mm) .

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Q: Which fire escape ladder would be suitable for an apartment block with balcony rails?

A: The Kletterfix ladder is suitable for balcony rails and comes in lengths ranging from 15 ft to 66 ft. They are also available with or without distance pieces.

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Q: What type of fire escape ladder is suitable for use with small children and pets?

A: To be able to carry small children and pets down an escape ladder you would require a child harness or pet harness. These harnesses are suitable for use with all the escape ladders. The escape ladder that is most suitable for use with small children is the externally fixed Saffold ladder. If you would like a portable fire escape ladder suitable for children the X-It ladder offers the most stability. The Amigo ladder is very easy to deploy for children and has strong, wide steps, which help to descend safely.

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Smoke Alarms

Q: How can I test my heat alarm?

A: Our heat alarms have test buttons. Press the test button for about five seconds. If you want to test the alarm with a heat source you can test the alarm with a hair dryer. Be careful as not to damage the plastic or sensor with excessive heat. Do not attempt test using open fire as this will damage the unit!

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Q: How can I make sure I hear the smoke alarm?

A: Our mains powered smoke alarms and radio-interlinked alarms are all interlinked. If one alarm detects fire it passes that information to all other smoke alarms in the same system. You can interconnect some of our alarms with other smoke alarms from our range. We also offer fire detection systems for the hard of hearing featuring strobe lights and vibration pads for the pillow.

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Q: How do I interconnect different alarms that are 'interconnectable'?

A: EI battery-operated smoke alarms (have letter 'C' in the part number):With two strands of bell wire or twin cable. Kidde and Aico mains-powered alarms: With 3 core wire. All radio-interlinked smoke alarms: No signal cables required between the alarms. The alarms will interlink instead with radio-frequency.

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Q: Which smoke alarm has a relay contact to connect to a GSM dialer?

A: There are two main options:

For mains powered, any Ei140 or 160 series alarm can be mounted on an Ei128R or Ei128RBU relay base. This will then give a switched output from the volt-free relay contacts whenever the alarm is triggered.

For low-voltage, the Ei100R, 105R, Ei181, Ei186 can be used. All of these units have a built-in set of volt-free relay contacts to again give a switched output.

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Q: How do I operate Magnetic Door Retainers using a smoke alarm system without central panel?

A: Probably the easiest and option is to use Ei140 or Ei160 series smoke alarms. One of the units is mounted on an Ei128R relay base and all door holders would be wired through this relay base. The door holders used would be for example an electro magnetic door retainer. All units are run from a 230V AC supply. If any interlinked smoke alarm detects fire the relay contacts in the Ei128R will cut power to the door retainer which releases the fire door. The Ei140 and Ei160 series alarms do have an internal battery back-up so the alarms would still sound in the event of a mains failure. However, the door holders or the Ei128R relay will not operate without mains power, which means they would go into safe mode and let the door close.

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Q: How do Radio Interlinked Smoke alarms work?

A: Several RF smoke alarms form a group which has the ability to recognise each other's signals. If one of these alarms detects fire, it sends a digitally coded signal to the other alarms which then also sound an alarm. Radio-interlinked smoke alarms are used in larger houses, small commercial premises and wherever there is a risk that not everybody in the building will hear a fire alarm from a different part of the building.

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Q: Which alarms can be interlinked?

A: All mains powered smoke alarms can be interlinked with signal wire. However, we also offer mains powered AICO/Ei and Kidde Slick alarms with radio-interlink. This saves the connection cable between the units.

In addition we offer battery powered radio-interlinked smoke alarms. A sealed battery operated with ten year battery life is also available.

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Q: Do I have to wire mains powered RF alarms at all?

Yes, each mains powered smoke alarm has to be supplied with mains power. In retrofit situations, this power supply will usually be taken from the nearest light fitting. In new builds the electrician will create a dedicated electrical circuit for the alarms. Normal mains powered alarms require also a signal cable between the smoke alarms. Where radio-interlinked mains powered units are used no signal wire between the alarms is required.

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Q: How can the alarms interconnect without a cable connection?

A: Radio-interlinked smoke alarms replace the signal cable between alarms with RF communication. A radio signal is sent when the test button is pressed, or the alarm senses smoke. This is received by all the interlinked alarms in the system and will cause all alarms to sound.

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Q: How many alarms can be interconnected using radio frequency?

A: This depends from the model. Usually 12 or 15 alarms can be interconnected.

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Q: Is there any method of controlling a interlink system?

A: All our RF alarms offer a range of accessories, such as Manual Call Points. Ei and Aico RF units also offer manual fobs and wall switches to test or silence the system.

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Q: Do I need an ionisation or optical smoke alarm?

A: We recommend using an optical smoke alarm in hallways, as these are less likely to go off because of cooking fumes from a connected kitchen. Optical smoke alarms are also ideal for living rooms, dining rooms, bedrooms, as they are good at detecting smouldering fires from soft furnishings. For landings we recommend ionisation alarms. Heat alarms are designed for kitchens and garages. No alarms should be installed in bathrooms.

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Q: I run a bed and breakfast, so I don't want my smoke alarms to beep when the battery runs low, but I also don't want to replace them yearly if they are still charged. Are there any alternatives?

A: Change the alarms for long life, lithium battery powered alarm, which last 10 years. These are also available as radio-interlinked alarms. Alternatively you can install mains powered alarms.

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Q: Why do your mains powered alarms have batteries?

A: All our mains powered alarms have a battery backup. Although mains powered alarms without this option do exist (BS5839 part 6 grade E), we regard them as far too dangerous, as a lot of fires are caused by electrical faults leaving the building unprotected against fire if the smoke alarms have no backup battery. With our mains powered alarms you will always be protected.

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Q: Can I put my smoke alarm on the wall, or must it be mounted on the ceiling?

A: The best location to install your smoke alarm is in the centre of the ceiling rather than on the wall. During a fire, smoke initially rises and then spreads to the sides of the room. By installing the alarm on the ceiling, this ensures that you receive the earliest possible warning of a fire.

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Q: I need to install a number of alarms to an existing panel mains system, but don't want to install new wires everywhere. Can I install wireless units that will link to the panel system?

A: You can install mains powered radio-interlinked alarms in the rooms and a mains powered alarm with an Ei128R base near the central control panel. The Ei128R base would then be connected with wire to the panel.

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Q: What is the best way to test my alarm?

A: We recommend testing alarms by pressing the test button, as this is designed to simulate the presence of smoke at the alarm sensor. You can additionally use a smoke aerosol spray as an extra check.

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Q: Why is my alarm beeping?

A: In general there are three reasons an alarm might beep, other than when a fire is detected. It could indicate the alarm is over 10 years old and needs replacing. You can find the replace-by date on the alarm itself. Sometimes dust build-up can also set optical smoke alarms off. If this is the case, use a vacuum or hair dryer on the cold setting to clean it. Finally it could be an issue with the power supply. If it is a battery operated alarm, the battery might need replacing. If it is a mains powered alarm there could be a problem with the supply of power to the alarm.

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Q: Are there any restrictions to the distance a radio-interlinked smoke alarm will work?

A: Most radio-interlinked alarms have a range of 150 meters in an open space and up to 30 meters in buildings. The thickness of the walls and partitions will affect the travel distance of the signal.

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Q: How long do smoke alarms last before needing replacement?

A: It is recommended that smoke alarms are replaced after 10 years. This is because the sensors in the smoke alarms become less sensitive and may not activate when a fire is present.

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Q: Is there a combination smoke alarm which will detect both a fire and carbon monoxide?

A: The Kidde 900-0122 and the Kidde 10DS alarms detect both carbon monoxide and smoke.

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Q: Which interconnecting smoke alarms would be suitable to connect an upstairs landing, downstairs hallway and a kitchen?

A: The Ei 140 series with radio-interlink bases would be suitable for this application: Ei168RC/141 ionisation: best for landings Ei168RC/146 optical: best for hallway, living rooms etc Ei168RC/144 heat detector: best for kitchen and garage Alternatively the Ei160 series (again with radio-interlink bases): Ei168RC/161RC ionisation: best for landings Ei168RC/166RC optical: best for hallway, living rooms etc Ei168RC/164RC heat detector: best for kitchen and garage There are also battery operated radio-interlinked smoke alarms available (See Ei3100RF and Ei600RF series)

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Q: What is the difference between an ionisation and an optical (photoelectrical) smoke alarm?

A: Ionisation smoke alarms detect fast flaming fires and are suitable for landings. Optical smoke alarms detect slow smouldering fires typical for burning soft furnishings. Optical alarms are suitable for living rooms and sleeping areas and are used near kitchens as they are less prone to false alarms. Please note that ionisation alarms contain a small amount of radioactivity.

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Q: Can the sound level of smoke alarms be increased if they are used for hard of hearing?

A: Unfortunately the sound level on a smoke alarm cannot be adjusted.

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Q: The smoke alarm is mains powered do you need an electrician to connect them?

A: It is necessary that an electrician installs mains powered smoke alarms.

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Q: Do batteries in radio-interlinked alarms expire quicker than those in normal alarms?

A: Batteries in radio-interlinked alarms do expire quicker than in other smoke alarms. RF smoke alarms are, however, also available with a 10 year sealed long life lithium battery. This battery will last for the 10 year life of the smoke alarm.

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Q: Are the battery radio-interlinked smoke alarms suitable to install in a four storey house with thick walls?

A: Our radio-interlinked smoke detectors have a radio frequency range of about 30 meters in buildings. This means that as long as the detectors are all within 30 meters of each other, the interconnection should be achieved. Some of the RF smoke alarms can also act as repeaters, which means that larger distances can be achieved. So, a four storey house should normally be suitable for RF install.

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Q: Is there a radio-interlinking alarm system that will cover a large three storey house? If one is activated they all need to go off.

A: Our radio-intelinked alarms are designed to have 12 smoke alarm units interlinked with each other in any one series. However the alarms are able to recognise more than 11 other smoke alarms but there will just be no visual confirmation on each unit when going through the initial house coding procedure. Interlinking 12 alarms with 6 call points should work together providing each unit is no more than a 30m distance apart. Larger distances can be covered by using one of the smoke alarms in repeater mode, activated by flicking a switch.

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Q: How are smoke alarms fitted to the ceiling?

A: Smoke alarms can be either screwed to the ceiling using the holes on the base plate (screws provided) or fixed using a sticky pad, this can be added to your basket through the ordering process.

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Q: When the test button is pressed on an interlinking smoke alarm will this cause all the other units to go off, too?

A: Yes, by pressing the test button on one alarm all the units in that family will also be activated. To 'teach' the units which other smoke alarms belong to the same family, the smoke alarms have to be set up together during the installation. This is done by pressing a 'housecoding button' or similar process.

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Q: If a false alarm goes off can pressing the hush button on any of the interlinking alarms stop all the units beeping?

A: No, to stop the alarms from sounding the hush button on the unit that started the process needs to be pushed. Pressing any other unit will just silence that one unit. The unit can be identified by the rapidly flashing red LED.

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Q: How long do the batteries last in smoke alarms?

A: The 9V alkaline batteries last 12~18 months. This period also depends from how often the alarms are tested. Lithium bock batteries will last up to 5 years.

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Q: Can a wireless router interfere with the radio interlinked alarms?

A: A wireless router is very unlikely to interfere with the signal of your radio interlinked alarms, as the RF signal of the smoke alarms is digitally coded.

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Q: Can the mains powered smoke alarm range be connected to mains power via the lighting circuit?

A: Yes, hard-wired mains powered alarms can be wired to the unswitched live feed of the nearest frequently used lighting circuit.

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Q: How do I safely dispose of my old smoke alarms?

A: Safelincs is signed up to Valpak's WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) Distributor Take-Back Scheme (Registration ID: 7370). Private households can therefore drop off their electronic and electrical fire safety waste at their municipal recycling centre when they are purchasing new products from us. To find your nearest recycling centre, please visit www.recycle-more.co.uk.

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Q: What smoke alarm should I use in a bedroom with an en suite bathroom?

A: It is usually recommended to install an optical smoke alarm in a bedroom. This is because optical smoke alarms are slightly quicker at detecting slow smouldering fires than can original from upholstery type materials and over-heated wiring. Also, an optical smoke alarm would be less likely to sound a false alarm than what an ionisation would do if steam/water droplets were present from the bathroom. Detectors should be installed as central to the room as possible; however for your application I would also consider the position of the en suite to make sure that the detector is not in the direct path of the joining door. This is just to try and avoid the chances of a false alarm. No detector is designed for use in bathroom areas.

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Q: Can air purifiers affect ionisation smoke alarms?

A: Yes, air purifiers may cause ionisation smoke alarms to sound falsely.

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Q: My mains powered smoke alarm with lithium backup battery is beeping just after it has been installed. Why is that?

A: The lithium battery of the smoke alarm will have lost some of its charge in storage. While it is re-charging, the alarm is giving a low battery warning. This might take a few hours.

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Q: I live in a thatched property and want to renew all my fire alarms, both the ones I put in the attic next to the thatch and the ones I put in my home. Is it better to get heat alarms or smoke alarms?

A: There are three different types of alarms available - ionisation and optical smoke alarms and the heat alarm. The heat alarm is specifically designed for kitchen areas. This is because it is activated when the temperature reaches approx 57 degrees centigrade. In terms of the two smoke alarms, there is no right or wrong which to install as they are both going to detect a fire. The difference between the two is that ionisation smoke alarms are slightly quicker at detecting fast flaming fires that can cover a small area quite quickly. It is generally recommended for these to be installed in landing areas. Optical smoke alarms are slightly quicker at detecting slow smoldering fires. These originate from upholstery type materials or over heated wiring. These are usually installed in bedrooms, living rooms and downstairs hallways. In terms of the thatched area, it is usually recommended for an ionisation smoke alarm to be installed in the loft. This is because if the thatch caught alight, it is likely that the thatch would catch fire quickly. With any alarm installed in a loft area, we would recommend that the alarm is cleaned regularly. This is to try and avoid false alarms from happening.

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Fire Extinguishers

Q: Which fire extinguisher do you recommend?

A: It depends from the circumstances. Please refer to our multiple choice section where we will help you to determine suitable fire extinguishers for your application.

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Q: Can you refill extinguishers and do you sell extinguishers that can be re-filled?

A: All our Gloria and Ultrafire extinguishers are fully serviceable and can be re-filled. In accordance to the British Standard powder, foam and water extinguishers must be re-filled after 5 years. CO2 fire extinguishers must be re-filled after 10 years. An exception are the P50 service free extinguishers which do not require service or refilling for ten years.

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Q: Where can I store the extinguishers? And how do I fit extinguishers to the wall?

A:All our fire extinguishers come with brackets to fit them to a wall. Special vehicle brackets are available on request. You can also buy extinguisher cabinets and extinguisher stands to ensure that extinguishers clearly stand out and can always be located. The fire blankets can also be fixed to a wall.

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Q: Is it necessary to have your own fire extinguisher when exhibiting at a show?

A: Some shows may request that you have your own fire extinguisher for your stand at a show. This request is dependent on the risk assessment that will have been carried out for each individual event by the organisers. If you have been requested to take an extinguisher and have agreed to the terms and conditions of the event you must take one with you.

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Q: In a new building can I choose which extinguisher I want to install, either chrome or red extinguishers? Chrome extinguishers do not conform to BS EN3 as they are CE marked but not Kitemarked.

A: The red fire extinguishers are manufactured and kitemarked to BS EN3. The chrome units are not manufactured to the British standard but are still CE marked. There is no requirement for new buildings to only install the red extinguishers. You may have a clause in your insurance policy saying that you need extinguishers manufactured to BS EN 3 and installed according to BS5306, in which case you would be required to install the red units. But all extinguishers, red or chrome, can be installed and maintained to the British Standard so if that is the only stipulation then you can install chrome.

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Q: My building insurance states that the extinguishers installed need to be checked yearly by a competent person. Have the self-maintenance extinguishers been passed by insurance companies?

A: All major insurances have approved P50 fire extinguishers as servicing free fire extinguishers. The relevant sections in the extinguisher servicing standard BS5306-3:2009 state that a competent person needs to maintain all extinguishers and that such a competent person is primarily defined as to have the ability to carry out the procedures as defined by the manufacturer. The manufacturer Britannia Fire clearly states that only a visual inspection is required. When you purchase the Britannia extinguishers from us our engineers will install the extinguishers free of charge and train you how to carry out the yearly inspection. They also ensure that you are suitably covered in accordance to the relevant British Standards.The engineers will also issue you an installation certificate. There is also a video that demonstrates the visual inspection on the website.

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Q: What height should extinguishers be installed at?

A: The height at which to install extinguishers depends on the total weight of that particular extinguisher. If the weight of the extinguisher is less than 4kg, the top of the handle should be 1.5m above ground level when installed. If the mass weight is more than 4kg, the top of the handle should be 1.0m above ground level. When there is a combination of the two, both can be set at the height of the heaviest extinguisher.

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Q: Do your extinguishers come fully serviced and ready to use on delivery?

A: All our portable fire extinguishers are supplied fully charged and ready for use. Wheeled fire extinguishers with large capacity might require initial filling and charging. The product listing will explain this. There are options on the website if you are required to have your extinguishers commissioned on-site and we also offer a full installation service. These additional services will require an engineer to visit your site to carry out the work required.

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Q: Which type of extinguisher is suitable for a home that is concrete built but has a lot of timber cladding and calor gas cooker?

A: We would usually recommend a dry water mist extinguisher for mixed risk environments such as gas cooker and general risks. Powder extinguishers are NOT suitable for deep fat fryers and the latest British Standard does not recommend powder extinguishers within buildings any longer (exceptions apply)!

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Q: What type of fire extinguisher should a landlord have for tenants?

A: In an average sized rental property it is advisable for a landlord to provide the tenant with a fire blanket for the kitchen and a small portable fire extinguisher such as a 2ltr foam or 3ltr water with additive to cover the rest of the property. We stock a 2ltr ABF (suitable for flammable solids such as paper and cardboard, flammable liquids such as petrol, oils and fats, and deep fat fryers) fire extinguisher which would also provide additional cover for kitchens as it is suitable for use on deep fat fryers (chip pans). Another option for the landlord is a water mist fire extinguisher which uses the latest technology in fire fighting to enable a water fire extinguisher to tackle class A, B, C, F and electrical fires safely.

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Q: We are holding a school BBQ and need a fire extinguisher. The BBQ is fuelled by a gas cylinder. Can you advise what type of extinguisher we would need?

A: The latest development and the best in your situation is 'dry water mist' which is totally non-toxic and fights all types of fires. It also creates a safe cloud between the user and the fire and cannot harm children if used mischievously. Larger ones can be seen here: http://www.safelincs.co.uk/e-series-water-mist-fire-extinguishers/ A small one which might be more suitable: http://www.safelincs.co.uk/1-litre-water-mist-fire-extinguisher/

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Q: I have a 2kg Carbon Dioxide fire extinguisher, but unfortunately it is out of date. Can you please tell me what should I do? Is it possible to update it (if yes how can I do this?) or do I need to buy a new one?

A: CO2 extinguishers can be refurbished after 10 years. However, this involves stripping the paint and refilling the extinguisher. It is usually cheaper to buy a new one http://www.safelincs.co.uk/co2-fire-extinguishers/ or refurbished extinguishers e.g. http://www.safelincs.co.uk/refurbished-2kg-co2-fire-extinguisher/

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Q: I am the Company Secretary for a residents association. The property is a Victorian manor house which has been split into 9 individual flats/properties. Although we have adequate extinguishers in the common hallways, we would like to purchase a fire blanket and extinguisher for each property for internal use. Could you please advise which is the best model to purchase?

A: We can now offer some truly all-purpose extinguishers. These are called 'dry water mist' extinguishers and can be used in all domestic applications. They cause minimum damage to surrounding areas and are entirely non-toxic. Please see http://www.safelincs.co.uk/e-series-water-mist-fire-extinguishers/ and http://www.safelincs.co.uk/1-litre-water-mist-fire-extinguisher/ As far as fire blankets are concerned, the following is suitable for domestic environments http://www.safelincs.co.uk/economy-fire-blanket-from-homesaver/

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Q: When ordering fire extinguishers for our business, do we have to have on-site certification or installation?

A: The Regulatory Reform Order (Fire Safety) 2005 states that you need to provide suitable firefighting equipment but doesn’t give any guidance on what you need (in fact it is rather vague on this). Instead, it refers you to relevant guidance such as the British Standard BS 5306-8:2012 which gives information on how to work out your premises’ extinguisher provision and states that extinguishers should be commissioned (certificated on-site). Because this British Standard is not a law you won’t get into trouble for ignoring it, as long as there are no incidents. If, however, there is a fire and someone is injured, the first thing the Fire Officer will do is check whether you followed the ‘guidance’ in relation to your fire safety. If you didn’t he will want to know why not and potentially prosecute you for negligence. So the short answer to the question is ‘NO’ you don’t have to have on-site certification, but the long answer is a resounding ‘YES’ you do.

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Q: We have a abc 1kg extinguisher. Not sure how old. How do I know if it is still in working order?

A: You ought to replace the extinguisher after about ten years. However, if the age is not known, shake the extinguisher - if you can hear the powder moving freely inside (flowing rather than 'clonking') and the pressure gauge is still in the green the extinguisher should be fine. For larger powder fire extinguishers, please see our guide about dates on extinguishers.

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Q: We have a 6 litre Hydrospray fire extinguisher in one of our offices, and want to add the accompanying ID signage to complete the job. I'm getting conflicting information, with some saying a specific 'Hydrospray' sign must be displayed and others saying 'Water' is suitable as well. Can you advise what would be deemed suitable in this situation?

A: While ‘Hydrospray’ signage is available, ‘Hydrospray’ itself is simply a brand name for a water with additive extinguisher. They have the same firefighting suitability (Class A) as a standard water or water with additive so a simple water ID sign will be sufficient (you would use a water ID sign for water with additive extinguishers).

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Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Q: What is Carbon Monoxide?

A: Carbon Monoxide (chemical symbol: CO) is a colourless, odourless, tasteless and toxic gas created by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels (gas, oil, coal and wood), as used in our everyday appliances such as heaters, engines and boilers.

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Q: Why is Carbon Monoxide dangerous?

A:Having no colour, smell or taste means that it is very hard to detect. Inhaling carbon monoxide reduces the blood's ability to carry oxygen, leaving the body's organs and cells starved of oxygen. Each year, over 50 people die in the UK as a direct result of exposure to Carbon Monoxide Gas (CO). Many more people die through strokes and respiratory illness made worse by inhaling low levels of CO over prolonged periods. More, still are left with permanent damage and invalidity.

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Q: What are the symptoms of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning?

A:The symptoms of mild Carbon Monoxide poisoning are similar to those of viral cold infections: headache, nausea, dizziness, sore throat and dry cough. More severe poisoning can result in a fast and irregular heart beat, over-breathing (hyperventilation), confusion, drowsiness and difficulty breathing. Ultimately it leads to coma and death.

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Q: How can you protect you and your family?

A:Make sure rooms and heaters are well ventilated, have your chimneys and flues checked regularly, make sure boilers and heaters are maintained and serviced regularly. Buy a Carbon Monoxide alarm/detector. A Carbon Monoxide alarm will measure the concentration of Carbon Monoxide in a room and sound an alarm if the CO concentration is higher than permitted

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Q: What are the regulations to testing CO detectors? Do I need to use test gas?

A: There is no legal or BSI requirement to test the CO detectors with a test gas. A weekly check with the test button is fully sufficient if you choose a quality CO detector. The test gas is offered as a 'belts and braces' option.

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Q: Is there a carbon monoxide alarm for the hearing impaired?

A: Yes, we supply a strobe and vibration pad for the deaf and hard of hearing, Ei170RF, which can be linked to a mains powered carbon monoxide alarm, Ei262.

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Q: Where should I install carbon monoxide detectors?

A: CO detectors should be installed near boilers and other potential sources of carbon monoxide. Keep a 1 to 3 meter distance to the boiler etc to avoid small start-up CO discharges to cause false alarms.
As you are likely to be most affected by CO in areas of your home that you spend the most time in it is advisable to install detectors in those areas as well, such as the living room and bedrooms.
It is also worth noting that while one detector is better than no detectors at all, larger homes may require several detectors to cover the property fully.

Which areas to avoid?

Do not install CO alarms above or below windows.

Although most kitchens contain fuel burning appliances it is not recommended to install your detector there. Kitchens can be quite steamy while you are cooking and this may affect the sensor in the CO detector. Similarly it is not recommended to install detectors in dusty areas such as workshops or garages.

For more information please watch our video guide

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Emergency Lighting

Q: Why use Emergency Lighting?

A:Emergency Lighting and Illuminated Emergency Exit Signs light up and mark the emergency exit route when the power supply fails. The minimum backup duration of emergency lighting and emergency exit signs is specified by local regulations and is generally between 1 and 3 hours. All our units have internal batteries with 3 hours backup duration. Self-contained emergency lights and fire exit signs are classified according to their modes of operation:

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Q: What is LED Emergency Lighting?

A:LED emergency lights use less energy than emergency lights with traditional fluorescent bulbs and contain less harmful waste. The trickle charge of the battery even with the light off is also lower. LED lights are also longer lasting than tubes. Whilst Cadmium for use in emergency lighting is currently still allowed, our range of LED emergency lighting products only uses NiMH batteries, which are more environmentally friendly. Government financial assistance is also available to switch to low energy emergency lighting and exit signs, see www.eca.gov.uk.

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Q: What are IP Ratings?

A: The IP rating system classifies the protection of emergency lights and exit signs from dust, water and impact afforded by electrical equipment and their enclosures. The system is recognised in most European countries and is set out in IEC529 (BS EN 60529: 1992) Degrees of Protection provided by Enclosures (IP code).
The degree of protection is expressed as 'IP', followed by two numbers which define the degree of protection. The first digit indicates the extent, to which the equipment is protected against particles, or to which persons are protected from enclosed hazards. The second digit indicates the extent of protection against water.IP20

(2) SOLID - Protected against solid objects over 12mm diameter, not exceeding 80mm long, e.g. fingers
(0) LIQUID - Not protected

IP23

(2) SOLID - Protected against solid objects over 12mm diameter, not exceeding 80mm long, e.g. fingers
(3) LIQUID - Protected against sprayed water at up to 60° from the vertical

IP40

(4) SOLID - Protects against solid objects over 1.0mm, e.g. small wires
(0) LIQUID - Not protected

IP43

(4) SOLID - Protects against solid objects over 1.0mm, e.g. small wires
(3) LIQUID - Protected against sprayed water at up to 60° from the vertical

IP44

(4) SOLID - Protects against solid objects over 1.0mm, e.g. small wires
(4) LIQUID - Protected when sprayed from any direction - limited ingress allowed

IP54

(5) SOLID - Protects against dust, limited ingress (no harmful deposit)
(4) LIQUID - Protected when sprayed from any direction - limited ingress allowed

IP55

(5) SOLID - Protects against dust, limited ingress (no harmful deposit)
(5) LIQUID - Protected against low pressure jets, from all directions - limited ingress allowed

IP64

(6) SOLID - Dust tight. Totally protected against dust
(4) LIQUID - Protected when sprayed from any direction - limited ingress allowed

IP65

(6) SOLID - Dust tight. Totally protected against dust
(5) LIQUID - Protected against low pressure jets, from all directions - limited ingress allowed

Q: Maintained/Non Maintained how are they different?

A:Non maintained means the light will only operate in the event of a mains failure, Maintained means the lamp operates at all times and stays lit for the minimum emergency duration after a mains failure.

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Q: Which emergency light would be suitable to install in a house of multiple occupancy that is both an emergency light and ordinary light providing light for daily use and also a 3 hour emergency light in case of energy failure?

A: Our Decorative Emergency Lights are available in either Maintained [lit all the time and will continue to operate after a mains failure] or Non-Maintained [will only come on in the event of a mains failure]. Most of the Maintained lights are also switchable, which means they can be wired to function both as ordinary lights and as emergency lights at the same time. Switchable lights are clearly marked as such in the product description. Please visit http://www.safelincs.co.uk/Emergency-Escape-Lighting/

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Q: Can the emergency lights with IP65 rating be fitted with emergency showers?

A: Yes, as this rating identifies that the unit is protected against low pressure jets from all directions - limited ingress permitted.

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Q: How are emergency lights installed?

A: The emergency lights can be either screwed to the wall or ceiling. The product is linked into the mains lighting system. Often, an interrupt switch is installed to allow the testing of the emergency light (also called fish key switch)

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Q: What is a luminaire?

A: ‘Luminaire’ is the technical term for an emergency light, including the lamp or lamps plus all fixing, connective and protective elements of the fitting. It includes internally illuminated signs.

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Q: What is the glow wire, or hot wire, test?

A: A test of the battery enclosure of an emergency luminaire. The test is to 850 ⁰C, as specified in BS EN 60598-2-22, whose purpose is to ensure that the battery circuits are adequately protected so that internal circuit faults will not set fire to the luminaire.

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Q: What is a self-contained luminaire?

A: An emergency light or sign that either contains all the parts necessary to function independently (e.g. battery, lamp, control gear, etc.) or whose housing is sited within a metre of these parts.

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Q: Can maintained emergency lights be installed as non-maintained?

A: Yes, if you have a maintained emergency light fitting, it is possible to install the unit as non-maintained. During installation, the "link wire" would need to be removed. On the other hand a non-maintained fitting can not be wired up as maintained.

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Fire and Data Safes

Q: What is Cash Rating and how is it determined on a Cash or Burglary Safe?

A:The Cash Rating of a safe relates to the amount of cash for which an insurance company will offer overnight insurance cover. As with all insurance companies this value can vary slightly depending on location and may be higher or lower than the manufacturer recommended Cash Rating quoted. Please check with your insurer for exact ratings. Cash Ratings are determined by door and wall thickness, lock types used and the general build quality of a safe. The higher the Cash Rating the more secure the safe is.

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Q: How is the fire rating determined on a Fireproof or Data Safe?

A: The following is an explanation of internationally accepted fire resistant safe testing procedures for 30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 minutes. During all tests the internal temperature must remain below 177°C when exposed to furnace temperatures during a one hour test period of 925°C, a two hour test period of 1010°C and a three hour test period of 1105°C.

  1. Fire Endurance Test
    This test measures the temperature rise over a given time span. Thermocouples are fixed on all six internal surfaces of the safe to record the temperature rise inside the safe, the unit is locked and placed inside a specially constructed test furnace where the temperature is raised in accordance with the standard temperature curve BS 476 to the required test temperature and for the appropriate time period. Once cooled, the unit is opened and examined for usability. The unit locking mechanisms and parts fastenings are examined for security and the interior examined for visible evidence of undue heat transmission.
  2. Explosion Hazard Test
    This test is designed to simulate the safe being suddenly exposed to superheated temperatures which could cause the fire resisting compounds used in the safe to expand rapidly and explode. The safe is locked and placed into a furnace preheated to 1095°C. This temperature is maintained for 30 minutes (2 hour test is 45 minutes) and if no explosion results, the unit is allowed to cool without opening the furnace doors.
  3. Fire Drop Test
    This test measures the strength of the safe and its ability to withstand the effect of falling through a burning and collapsing building. The safe is locked and placed into a furnace preheated to 925°C. This temperature is maintained for 30 minutes before the safe is removed hoisted to a height of 10 metres and dropped onto a bed of rubble. The safe is then placed back in the furnace upside down for a further 30 minutes.

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Q: Does my safe require installing?

A: Msome of the safe we sell will require installation either by yourself or by a professional installation engineer. Further information regarding installation is displayed on each product listing. Full installation instructions are included with your safe.

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Q: Are there any additional charges for delivery to an upper floor or via steps?

A: Our Free Delivery includes the delivery of the safe to your door, only. This applies to any UK mainland location. Please note that we can not deliver with this standard delivery if there are stairs leading to your door. Please contact us if you are uncertain or want the safe to be delivered over stairs.

If you require the fire safe to be delivered into the building, you can choose an upgrade to indoor delivery with a hand pallet truck by clicking the relevant upgrade within our product description. Please note that this option is not available for smaller fire safes. If you choose this upgrade the driver will arrive with a suitable vehicle with tail lift and pallet truck. The driver will position the safe into any position that can be reached with a hand pallet truck. This can also include the use of any lifts available, as long as the size and weight-carrying capacity of the lift is suitable. The driver will position the safe and remove the packaging. The access to the building must have no obstructions, eg steps etc. Please notify us if you have any steps in the building, as the driver might not be able to move the hand pallet truck over the steps.

If you require the safe to be transported to different floor levels via stairs, please ring us on 0800 077 6149 or e-mail us on support@safelincs.co.uk . We will then discuss your particular situation and can quote any extra transport costs, if necessary.

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Q: Can I change the electronic lock combination myself?

A: Yes, full instructions on how to do this will be in your safe manual. If you no longer have your manual please contact us for further information.

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Q: What if the batteries run down on a safe with an electronic lock?

A: All Electronic locks are designed to save your combination through an internal memory even if the batteries run down. Batteries are accessible from the outside of the safe and are very easy to replace by following the manufacturer instructions.

Q: Do fireproof filing cabinets actually work?

A:There are a lot of fire protection filing cabinets and fire safes on the market to protect paperwork. You just need to make sure you pick the right category depending from the material/media you are trying to protect. The following options are available:

1) Fire safes/fireproof filing cabinets for paper and valuables, which are keeping the inside temperature in the fire safe down below 177°C during a 'standard' fire for the stated period of time. Above this temperature, paper will get damaged

2) Fire safes for paper, valuables and Digital Media such as hard drives, USB sticks, DVDs, CDs ect. These safes keep the inside temperature below 125°C. Above this temperature, the drives would get damaged

3) Fire safes for paper, valuables, Digital Media and Magnetic Media (floppies, backup tapes and even photographic film). These media are far more sensitive and the safes have to keep the inside temperature very low at below 52°C to avoid damage

4) Very handy are also combi fire safes with separate sections for paper/valuables and for magnetic media

To choose the right fireproof safe, you need to choose, which materials/media you want to store, how much internal fire safe space you require and for how long you want to protect. Some distributors offer Overview pages.

If you for example choose a safe with 1 hour fire protection, this safe should be able to hold the inside temperature below the temperature required for the materials/media stored inside for at least one hour, even if the safe stands at the centre of a typical fire. In reality, this does not happen very often and most safes will protect the contents for much longer periods, as the fire temperature in the locality of the safe is usually lower than in the centre of the blaze.

You can choose different styles of fire safes:

-fireproof filing cabinets, which are usually designed for protection of paper and match the normal look and function of filing cabinets.

-Front-opening fire safes, which are suited for longer protection times and usually can hold more content

-top opening fireproof boxes, which are good for small amounts of items requiring protection

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Q: If the keypad for my Phoenix safe is damaged in a fire, how will I gain entry to the contents?

A: Phoenix can send out an engineer to gain entry for you. We also offer a free after-fire replacement guarantee on all our products.

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Q: What can I store in a fire safe?

A: Manufacturers of fireproof storage units focus on three main types of product:

Paper (e.g. passports, certificates, insurance policies, deeds and cash (notes);

Digital media (e.g. USB / memory sticks, DVDs, CDs, digital cameras, iPods, MP3 players and external hard drives);

Data / magnetic media (e.g. computer back-up tapes, floppy disks, traditional internal hard drives and video / audio tapes).

It is important to choose the correct specification of safe, according to the type of product(s) you wish to protect.

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Q: What is meant by ‘humidity level’?

A: Data media and film are particularly vulnerable to the humidity generated inside a fire safe during a fire. Fireproof storage units designed to protect this type of product are therefore tested to the following critical levels:

Film: 85% humidity restriction

Data: 80% humidity restriction

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Q: What is meant by ‘water resistance’?

A: Some fire safes offer resistance to the ingress of water as well as fire protection for a specified length of time. Sources of water may include sprinklers, hoses or even flooding.

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Firedoors

Q: Can the seals be fitted to the door instead of the frame?

A: The seals can be fitted to either the door or frame.

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Q: Can remote sounders be fitted to a fire door that requires monitoring?

A: The Exit Stopper can have remote sounders linked to it using a cable to connect the two. There is no distance restriction to this.

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Q: How can existing fire doors that have no seals be updated to conform to regulations?

A: The Surface Mounted Fire and Smoke Seal kits can be used. They can be fitted to the door or the door frame. A double door kit is available, which means that the seals would need to be fitted to the doors rather than the door frame, so that the gap between the doors is covered.

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Q: Can a FD30 fire door be fitted with only one self closing hinge and two normal hinges?

A: It is generally recommended to have two self-closing hinges per door (top and bottom). The middle fire door hinge does not have to be self-closing.

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Q: Can you please explain the closing force rating 1-6 for door closers?

A: The closing force rating 1-6 relates to the maximum width and weights of fire door that the door closer is suitable for and if you click on the link below and then click on the EN size guide this gives the table with the closing force categories and the relevant maximum door widths and weights. http://www.safelincs.co.uk/Door-Closers/

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Q: Is there an alternative method to secure a fire exit door that is used to gain entrance into a building other than using the push bar on the inside and key access from the outside which will prevent the door being left unlocked?

A: An alternative to the key operated knob device is to have a code lock handle device. Therefore the tenants would have to enter the four to ten digit code into the handle each time they required access back into the building. The door could also be fitted with a door closer to ensure that it clicks shut.

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Q: Can glass panic bolts still be used?

A: Currently there is no legislation related to glass panic bolts to say they cannot be used. However the glass replacement tubes do produce sharp edges. There is an alternative product that can be used which is ceramic and does not produce sharp edges when smashed.http://www.safelincs.co.uk/Ceramtube-Spare-Ceramic-Tube-for-the-Redlam-Panic-Bolt/

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Other Products

Q: What is difference between an intumescent seal and a smoke seal?

A: A smoke seal has a brush which prevents smoke from spreading between rooms and an intumescent seal will expand to seal the gaps around the door and prevent the fire from spreading. We sell mainly combined fire and smoke fire door seals.

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Q: What is the approved UK standard for self-contained breathing apparatus in any fire (manufacturing industry)

A: You need a product in accordance to EN137:2006 Type 1: Self-contained open circuit compressed air Breathing Apparatus with full face mask for industrial use. But you still need to carry out a risk assessment to see if there are special risks, such as flame engulfment or special pressure requirements, temperature etc. A standard product would be the Draeger PA94

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Q: Which evacuation device is most suited to use within a residential school where some students have a physical disability?

A: There are several options available: Emergency evacuation sledges, wall mounted, suitable for narrow corridors. Two people are required to use this device. http://www.safelincs.co.uk/Emergency-Evacuation-Sledges-Section-1/ Evacuation sheets, placed under the mattress of those who would require assistance in an emergency. Two people are required to use this device. http://www.safelincs.co.uk/Emergency-Evacuation-Sheets-Section-1/ Evacuation chair, wall stored this device can be used by one person. http://www.safelincs.co.uk/Evac-Chair-300H-Emergency-Evacuation-Chair/

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Purchases and Delivery

Shopping Process

Q: I cannot see the prices on your website. Why?

A: We are using 'cookies' to operate our shopping cart systems. If your browser settings are set at too high a security setting, your computer might not allow the 'cookies'. Please allow temporarily the usage of cookies while you are browsing our website. Alternatively, please ring us and place an order over the phone.
Our cookies contain only information about the shopping cart!

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Q: I need my purchased product urgently!

A: Please ring us and we will quote you the special freight costs.

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Q: I don't live in the UK, France, Germany, Italy or USA. I still would like to order. What can I do?

A: Please e-mail our sales staff at support@safelincs.co.uk with your request and we will quote you a price including the added delivery costs. We will also contact you by phone so that you can purchase our products.

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Q: I don't want to use credit cards to pay. How can I pay?

A: You can pay by cheque. Please complete the 'pay by cheque' option on the purchase page of our online shopping cart, or simply send us a letter with a description of the product desired with a cheque payable to Safelincs for the correct amount including postage to:

Safelincs
Unit 1
Farlesthorpe Road
Alford
Lincs
LN13 9PS

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Returns Policy

Q: Can I return my purchased products under any circumstances?

A: We strive to give you full satisfaction and will always try to act according to your wishes. We are accepting cancellations up to 7 days from the receipt of goods and you can return up to 14 days following the cancellation. Please see our Terms and Conditions for details. However, there are some restrictions linked to the nature of our safety products.

The Kidde fire escape ladders will only be accepted as a return as long as the velcro strap holding together the rungs has not been undone.

We do not accept smoke alarms and fire extinguishers unless they are still in the original, unopened packaging. The smoke alarm for the deaf and hard of hearing, however, can be opened and still be returned, as this is important to assess the suitability of the product for your needs.

This does not affect your statutory rights.

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Q: Who pays for the return of the products?

A: The cost for the return is carried by the customer.

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Q: When do I receive my refund?

A: As soon as we receive the goods, we will check the state of the goods and immediately instruct SagePay to refund you on your credit card. If you paid by cheque we will send you a refund cheque.

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Q: Do I receive a full refund?

A: Yes. You will be refunded the full amount paid to us by yourself. The only exception is the cost for special delivery charges we might have paid if you have requested special delivery.

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Q: Can schools and other public sector bodies set up an account?

A: Yes, all public sector bodies are welcome to set up an account with us. On receipt of an official purchase order a 30 day account will automatically be set up for you.Purchase orders can be sent via fax: 01507 463288 or e-mail: service@safelincs.co.uk. Once the purchase order has been received the goods will be dispatched to you and an invoice sent payable within 30 days.

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Bulk Orders

Q: We are a retailer and would be interested in selling your products. What can you offer?

A: We are supplying supplying reselers and installers in the UK and other countries with batches of fire safety equipment. Please send us an e-mail to quotations@safelincs.co.uk stating the type of product you are interested in and the required volumes. Please state also a delivery address and we will reply quickly.

Tel: 0800 612 6537
Email: support@safelincs.co.uk