Sigma Smart+Shield – Deterring the Misuse of Emergency Exits

Emergency exits need to be accessible and easy top open, however, casual use of these exits can cause obvious problems, for example in shops and schools. The Smart+Shield Emergency Exit Alarm is designed to solve this problem.

Sigma Smart+Shield Emergency Exit AlarmThe exit alarm is fitted on or next to the exit door and sounds a very loud alarm if the door is opened un-authorised. The unit can be powered by either a 9V battery or from the mains. You can set the volume to either 75dB or 95dB and there’s also a delayed alarm setting, which will only sound if the door is left open – which is helpful for doors that need to be used regularly by authorised personnel. Following a door alarm activation the alarm can self-reset after either 30 or 180 seconds, or you can choose to activate it with the integrated keyswitch.  All Smart+Shields are also supplied with a fluorescent sticker that can be placed across the alarm, making it clear that the door is not for casual use.

ECSG950 Smart+Shield for panic bars in situThe base model of the Smart+Shield will work with any door when installed next to a magnetic contact (supplied with the alarm) on the door or the door frame. If you have installed panic bars you can mount the appropriate Smart+Shield behind the bar, increasing its impact as a visual deterrent.

The touch and panic bar models also have an extra feature: pre-alarm. They can sense slight pressure on the bar, starting a temporary alarm. If the bar is released then the alarm will silence itself, but will convert to a full alarm if the door is opened.

To place an order or find out more about the Smart+Shield visit our product listing. Alternatively you can contact our friendly sales and support staff by calling 0800 612 6537 or sending an email to support@safelincs.co.uk.

Daniel Bennett

Daniel Bennett

Product Administrator

Daniel is one of our product administrators. He has a wealth of knowledge when it comes to emergency lighting, fire alarms and smart products.

Latest Posts by Daniel Bennett

Sigma Smart+Shield – Deterring the Misuse of Emergency Exits19th April 2017

What are Generations and do They Matter for Nest Products?

It is well known that computer-based technology advances very quickly, with products being outdated and replaced by a newer version, or ‘generation,’ almost every year. Nest Labs’ range of ‘smart home’ products is no exception to this as the oldest two have already undergone a few iterations of redesign and improvement.

Safelincs has a close relationship with Nest in the UK and gets its stock directly from them, so you can be assured that you’re buying the latest models. However, if you already own Nest products that may be older models you have nothing to worry about as there is no issue mixing new and old generations of Nest devices in your home.

Nest Protect
Nest Protect

The Nest Protect combines an industrial-grade smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector with voice alerts, status and testing via a smartphone app, and a range of extra features like a motion-sensing nightlight. With the second generation, you can even hush false alarms from the app.

The 2nd generation Nest Protect has been redesigned with a more curved and smooth profile, a clear difference from the 1st gen’s mostly square form. However, the new design isn’t just a prettier face; it has become an even more formidable guardian for your home as it is the first domestic smoke alarm to sport a ‘split-spectrum’ smoke sensor.

Utilising two frequencies of light, it can more accurately detect finer particles released by fast-flaming fires. The new Nest Protect also has a special wire mesh to decrease false alarms caused by dust or bugs. Furthermore, by changing the materials and components used in manufacturing, the 2nd gen Protect has a lifespan of 10 years compared to the 1st generation’s 7 years.

Nest Learning Thermostat

While the new Nest Learning Thermostat is a little slimmer than gen 2, the most noticeable difference is the much larger screen – 8.25cm vs 7cm – and they haven’t forgotten to increase the resolution to take advantage of this upgrade. Nest has also replaced the proximity sensor in the latest model which enables the thermostat to detect you across the room and wake up the screen, showing you the current time or temperature.

Some more functional updates in the 3rd generation involved not only upgrading the integrated WiFi chip, to support 5GHz for futureproofing against newer routers and to reduce dropped connections, but Nest also added support for OpenTherm. If your boiler supports this technology, the Nest Learning Thermostat can now help you manage your hot water as well as central heating.

If you do not recognise your Nest thermostat here, please visit https://nest.com/support/article/How-can-I-tell-which-Nest-Learning-Thermostat-I-have. You may have an older generation thermostat which was not made for compatibility with European systems.

Nest Cam
Nest Cam
The Nest Cam comes in two versions, Indoor and Outdoor, though both are on their first iteration so no matter where you see them or how long you’ve had one, it’s still the latest model. The black Indoor model is almost shaped like an inverted raindrop and has a noticeably slimmer and sleeker profile compared to its weatherproof brother, which appears more like a white coffee cup with no handle.

Regardless of which model you purchase you’ll get a bunch of great features like snapshots of activity over the last 3-hours, optional subscriptions for 10- or 30-day full video history, the ability to view live video from anywhere over the Internet, and 2-way voice communications between the Nest app and your Nest Cam. The only functional differences between the two are their mounting options and that the Outdoor model’s components are weatherproof.

To summarise, while Nest’s offerings have gone through a varying number of upgrades you can rest assured that, as long as you don’t accidentally purchase a first generation Learning Thermostat, all of your Nest gadgets will work together seamlessly. If you really want to have the latest models, though, Safelincs has you covered.
For any questions or to place an order you can call us on 0800 978 8202 or email support@safelincs.co.uk.

Outdoor Fire Safety

As summer finally seems to be upon us, Fire Kills, the Government department dedicated to improving fire safety, has made ‘Outdoor Fire Safety’ the theme for June. As an official Fire Kills sponsor, Safelincs is helping to spread the message.

barbecueBarbecues

Safety initiatives over the years have meant that actual fires caused by barbecues are uncommon. However, according to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA), almost 2,000 people attend A&E units each year having had an accident involving a barbecue. Some of the accidents lead to very serious burns, usually as a result of using an accelerant such as petrol to light the fuel. The number of accidents usually increases if we have a hot summer.

Messages from Fire Kills that the fire service are being asked to communicate to the public include:
• Don’t drink too much alcohol if in charge of the barbecue (or any cooking!).
• Make sure the barbecue is well away from sheds, fences, trees, shrubs or garden waste.
• Never leave a barbecue or any cooking unattended.
• Never use a barbecue indoors; fumes from barbecues include the deadly gas carbon monoxide
• Keep a bucket of water, sand or the garden hose nearby for emergencies.
• Follow the safety instructions provided with disposable barbecues.
• Never use petrol or paraffin to start or revive a barbecue; use only recognised lighters or starter fuels on coal.
• Empty ashes onto bare garden soil, not into dustbins or wheelie bins. If they’re hot, they can melt the plastic and start a fire.

Camping

A few basic precautions are advised that will reduce the risk of fires starting and spreading:
• Never use candles in or near a tent – torches are safer.
• Don’t smoke inside a tent.
• Place the cooking area well away from the tent and clear of anything that could catch fire easily such as long, dry grass
• Set up tents at least six metres apart and away from parked cars.
• Keep cooking area clear of items that catch fire easily, including long, dry grass and in a place where they can’t easily be knocked over.
• Keep matches, lighters, flammable liquids and gas cylinders out of the reach of children.
• Have an escape plan and be prepared to cut your way out of your tent if there is a fire.

IT SHOULD BE PARTICULARLY STRESSED THAT BARBECUES SHOULD NEVER BE BROUGHT INSIDE A TENT. THEY EMIT DEADLY CARBON DIOXIDE FUMES (EVEN MORE WHEN THEY ARE COOLING DOWN). FATALITIES HAVE OCCURRED IN THE PAST.

Boat Safety

Fire safety on inland and coastal boats and pleasure crafts is also an issue. Fires can spread quickly on a boat, even on water. Smoke and carbon monoxide alarms and detectors should be installed as a matter of course. Additional messages when living on board include:
• Maintaining a boat’s fuel, gas and electrical systems on a regular basis.
• Setting up an emergency plan with everyone on board before setting out.

Caravans

Having working smoke and carbon monoxide alarms in a caravan is just as important as having them at home. Additional messages for those staying in caravans include:
• Ensure caravans and tents are at least six metres apart and away from parked cars.
• If smoking, use metal ashtrays – and never smoke in bed.
• Don’t leave children alone inside.
• Don’t block air vents
• Turn off all appliances before leaving the caravan or going to bed.
• Never use a cooker or heater whilst the caravan is moving.

The Countryside

Every year, fire destroys thousands of acres of countryside and wildlife habitats. Some fires are started deliberately, but most are due to carelessness. Dry ground in the summer means there’s an added risk of a fire starting. A few simple precautions will help reduce incidents.
• Extinguish cigarettes properly and never throw cigarette ends out of car windows.
• Avoid using open fires in the countryside.
• Don’t leave bottles or glass in woodland – sunlight shining through glass can start fires
• Only use barbecues in a suitable and safe area and never leave them unattended.
• If a fire is spotted in the countryside, report it to the fire and rescue service immediately.
• Don’t attempt to tackle fires that can’t be put out with a bucket of water – leave the area as quickly as possible.

Safelincs wishes its customers a happy and safe summer!

BBC turns to Safelincs to look after its journalists

Brazillian World Cup 2014 - BBCPresenters and reporters travelling to the World Cup in Brazil have been equipped with smoke alarms, heat alarms and carbon monoxide alarms by Safelincs.
Any organisation that has employees travelling abroad has a duty of care to ensure that their health and safety is protected. The BBC has its people covering football matches in different parts of Brazil and they will be staying in various types of accommodation.
“I’m sure the accommodation the journalists will be staying in will be perfectly safe,” commented Harry Dewick-Eisele, managing director of Safelincs. “However, uptake of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms has not been as great in South America as it has been in the UK, so the BBC is taking very sensible precautions for its employees travelling to the World Cup.”
Safelincs were able to provide the BBC with a comprehensive selection of products at competitive prices, all delivered in timescales that were second to none.

New Adapter Plate to Allow Dorgard to be Fitted to Steel Doors

The Dorgard fire door retainer has traditionally been suitable for use on wooden doors only.  The fixing screws supplied with the Dorgard did not allow for installation on steel doors – an application growing in popularity.  With the increase in steel door installations, it was evident that an adapter was needed to cater for this requirement.

Working with Fireco, the manufacturers, Safelincs now offer the new self-adhesive adapter plate, which allows for the Dorgard fire door retainer to be installed on a steel door.  The adapter is fitted quickly and easily and the Dorgard can be removed for maintenance purposes from the plate even after the install. The adapter plate is supplied with a chemical cleaning cloth to prepare the door’s surface and clear instructions for the installation.

Using the Dorgard fitting template as a guide, this allows for the installer to mark out the necessary position of the plate.  Once marked, the plate can be secured to the steel door using the self adhesive sticker pads. The Dorgard can then be fixed to the adapter plate using the fixing screws provided.

The adapter plate for steel doors can also be used with the wood effect Dorgard fire door retainers, as well as the metal cover finishes.

Fire Kills’ Annual Report 2010-11 highlights Safelincs’ contribution

The Department for Communities and Local Government’s Fire Kills campaign aims to raise awareness of key fire safety messages to the general public. Safelincs has been a partner of the Fire Kills campaign for a number of years and its contributions have been highlighted in the latest annual report.

As an online fire safety products retailer, Safelincs provides an opportunity to encourage those who are safety conscious to consider the wellbeing of their friends and family. They have created a ‘reminders’ website that allows people to sign up to receive free reminders about testing and replacing smoke alarms. This website (www.safelincs.co.uk/reminders) features the Fire Kills logo and supporting fire safety messages.

Safelincs were the exclusive retailer of the new Ei Electronics ‘easichange’ replacement alarms for mains-wired smoke alarms in 2010-11. They produced a leaflet in line with the Fire Kills identity guidelines featuring fire safety messages to ensure that customers’ smoke alarms were in good working order.”

The full Fire Kills report can be read on http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/fire/Firekillsreport201011

Safelincs presentation to National Chief Fire Officers Association

Safelincs was very pleased when they were asked to present a section at the National Prevention Committee Meeting which was held by the Chief Fire Officers Association at the end of January. The invitation to the West Midlands Fire Service headquarters came as a result of our partnership in the Government’s Fire Kills campaign.

The Fire Kills representative for the campaign had previously tabled a paper expressing concerns that large numbers of households may now have mains powered smoke alarms that are past their useful working life. In 1992 the Building Regulations were amended, requiring every new build to have mains powered, interconnected smoke alarms installed. Many smoke alarms installed under this regulation are still in use and are potentially approaching their twentieth year of operation. This has raised the question; “when should mains powered smoke alarms be replaced?”

Research carried out in the USA and Canada tends to support the manufacturers recommendation that all smoke alarms, mains or battery powered, should be replaced every ten years. The results of this research supports claims that a smoke alarms effectiveness may be compromised over time due to accumulated dust, insects, airborne contaminants and corrosion of electrical circuitry.

The two main issues surrounding the replacement of mains powered alarms are:

  1. Making people aware that smoke alarms do not last forever and need to be replaced after a certain amount of time
  2. A concern that, when made aware, householders will be scared off replacing their units due to the expense and inconvenience of having to call out an electrician to carry out the replacement.

Harry Dewick-Eisele, managing director of Safelincs, presented a new product at the committee meeting which has been specifically designed to address the second issue. easichang®, is a replacement detector head containing the sensor and circuitry for a range of Ei Electronics smoke and heat alarms – the UKs most widely used mains powered alarms. Using the removal tool provided, the old head unit can be removed leaving the base plate (which is wired into the mains power) in situ. The new head unit can then be easily installed on the existing base without requiring an electrician.

The presentation sparked a lot of interest with most in attendance seeing the benefits of these products. Plans are now under way to carry out UK based research which will help to provide crucial evidence as to how frequently smoke alarms should be replaced.

The meeting was left on a positive note with delegates returning home to continue discussions with colleagues about the most successful way to promote the active replacement of smoke alarms no longer fit for purpose.

Containing The Risk

There are many regulations regarding the storage of harmful substances, personal protective equipment and first-aid equipment. These regulations are put into place to ensure the safety of employees in the workplace and require the employer to carry out mandatory risk assessments to identify and store hazardous substances correctly.

Using chemicals or other hazardous substances at work can put people’s health at risk. COSHH cabinets are designed to store any substance that carry warning labels such as “Toxic”, “Irritant” or “Harmful”. They have removable sump trays in the base to catch any spillages and prevent leakage.  These robust cabinets must meet the strict requirments of the COSHH regulations 2002.

The Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 place a duty on employers to provide adequate first-aid equipment, facilities and personnel to their employees. First-aid cabinets are designed to meet the storage requirements of these regulations and keep all first-aid equipment in a central, identifiable, location where they are easily accessed in case of emergency.

PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) cabinets are ideal for storing any protective equipment in an easily identifiable are. PPE includes equipment such as safety footwear, hard hats, high visibility waistcoats, goggles, life jackets, respirators and safety harnesses. These cabinets must comply with The Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1994.

To aid employers with the storage of these substances, protective equipment and first-aid equipment, and to help ensure the safety of employees,  Safelincs has added three fantastic lines to its Hazardous Storage Cabinets range.

Fire Safety Story Winners Announced!

We’ve just finished sending out several boxes of CO Alarms to our Twitter followers, Facebook Fans and visitors to our web site. Last weekend we asked you all to send us your favourite fire safety stories so we could share them on our web site. It was our goal to bring together a valuable and compelling collection of stories to learn from, which will help to motivate readers to improve their fire safety protection. The response was excellent, and it didn’t take us long to receive over 200 entries.

Some of the stories were funny, some were sad and some were plain shocking. But all the stories managed to emphasise the importance of taking fire safety seriously. Today we will start sharing them with everyone else on our web site. We’re sure you’ll enjoy them as much as we have!

We’d like to say a massive thank you to everyone who submitted their story. As promised, we have selected our favourite three entries and awarded them with an extra prize, as well as their CO Alarm:

1st place – Emma Morris
Winner of £100 worth of Love2shop vouchers

2nd place – Pat McMullan
Winner of £50 worth of Love2shop vouchers

3rd place – Sara Cumiskey
Winner of £25 worth of Love2shop vouchers

Keep an eye out for all the stories as they are released each week day on our Fire Safety Stories web page. We’d also love to hear your thoughts, feedback and own messages about the stories through Twitter and Facebook.

Clamp down on fire safety breaches

In 2009 London courts handed out fines of over £1m to companies, large and small, as well as to individuals due to breaches of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order.

These figures show that courts are taking any breaches of this order very seriously. In two cases people were even given jail sentences.

If you are responsible for fire safety in your company, make sure you take it as seriously as the courts, that way you won’t find yourself or your company punished with heavy fines to pay or jail sentences to serve.

For more information on this article go to  http://www.info4fire.com/news-content/full/london-pays-over-%C2%A31m-for-fire-safety-breaches