Project Shout launch 2017

This week sees Project Shout, a national awareness campaign highlighting the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning, launch its 2017 campaign.

Research carried out by Project Shout reveals that the suspected cases of CO (carbon monoxide) poisoning are ten times higher than previously thought. This means that a staggering 2500 cases of CO poisoning occur each year across England and Wales alone.

CO poisoning can have severe long term effects on health and causes around 50 deaths a year. Spreading awareness of the danger of this deadly gas is the ethos of Project Shout. Rob Lyon, campaign director for Project SHOUT, said: “These numbers are very concerning and highlight the fact that we need to do more to tackle the dangers of carbon monoxide and raise awareness of the symptoms.”

It is estimated that a staggering 40 million people are at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. This deadly gas cannot be smelt, seen or tasted. The only way to protect yourself is by having a CO alarm in your home. An alarm should be installed in every room where a fuel burning appliances is fitted. Carbon monoxide is produced from the incomplete combustion of a fossil fuel such as coal, gas, oil and wood.

Safelincs proudly supports Project Shout and is offering up to 33% discount on selected CO alarms. Make sure you are protected today.

Harry Dewick-Eisele

Harry Dewick-Eisele

Managing Director

MD and founder of Safelincs. Harry has a wealth of in-depth knowledge of all aspects of fire safety and related legislation.

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Carbon monoxide awareness campaign on buses

dominic-rodgers-trust-logoSafelincs are proud to support the Dominic Rodgers Trust in their Christmas campaign, launching on December 12th 2016, to increase the awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning. The initiative that is being run through First buses across Huddersfield, Halifax and Leeds will see a special promotion on the back of their tickets, reaching 1.5 million people.

Dominic Rodgers was 10 years old when he died in 2004 from carbon monoxide that seeped through his bedroom wall from a neighbour’s faulty appliance. His mum, Stacey Rodgers, has been campaigning tirelessly since the tragic accident to raise awareness of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Carbon monoxide (CO) has no smell, colour or taste and can only be detected by a CO alarm. As the symptoms of CO poisoning mimic those of flue, headache, dizziness and feeling nauseous, this campaign is very timely. The campaign offers travellers on First buses a 10% discount on a FireAngel carbon monoxide alarm.

Read more information about carbon monoxide poisoning.

Carbon Monoxide Danger on Holiday

Family vacationA recent ruling against a well-known holiday operator has again highlighted the very real dangers of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning for holidaymakers. The heartbreaking death of two young children on vacation with their family in Corfu occurred in October 2006. The return to prominence of this terrible and avoidable tragedy serves as a potent reminder of the risks of carbon monoxide whether at home or abroad.
Whilst general awareness of the threat posed by CO is rising, sadly most people simply fail to consider the issue when travelling. At home you are personally able to ensure that fuel burning appliances have been installed correctly and that they have been adequately maintained, however on holiday we rely on those managing the holiday accommodation to do this for us. Carbon monoxide is often cited as the most common cause of accidental poisoning. Children, babies and pregnant women are especially vulnerable, but everyone should take steps to protect themselves against the dangers of this invisible, odourless and lethal gas.
At high levels of exposure, carbon monoxide can kill within minutes. Just a single night’s sleep in proximity to a faulty boiler can prove fatal. The faulty appliance need not even be in the same room, as, frighteningly, CO is capable of reaching life threatening levels even when seeping through walls from adjacent areas.
The only way to ensure you are protected against this danger is to carry a portable CO alarm when travelling, and ensure it is active when you sleep. You may find advice elsewhere stating that colour changing dot type indicators are suitable to take on holiday, but this is simply not the case. People are by far at their most vulnerable when asleep, and these types of indicators cannot wake you in the event of carbon monoxide reaching dangerous levels whilst you sleep.
For as little as £13.67, you can ensure your family is safe from carbon monoxide poisoning throughout your holiday. Please make sure you add a carbon monoxide detector to your holiday checklist. It may be the most important thing you take with you.
For further information about the dangers of carbon monoxide and the symptoms you should look out for, please visit our CO information website.

Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week 2011

Carbon monoxide awareness week runs from Monday, November 21st to Friday, November 25th 2011. This annual event is organised to raise the awareness of the dangers of carbon monoxide and to reduce the number of fatalities due to carbon monoxide poisoning.

This year has seen several tragic deaths of campers through carbon monoxide poisoning as well as deaths in homes. These deaths were not only tragic but also avoidable. It is hoped that this years awareness week will increase the knowledge of the general public and prevent such deaths occurring.

If you have an appliance that burns fossil fuel, you could be at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. As this deadly gas has no smell, taste or colour the only way to detect it is by having a carbon monoxide alarm in your home. The symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are very similar to flu; headaches, nausea, dizziness, breathlessness and eventually collapse and loss of consciousness.  As a result of the early stages being similar to flu symptoms many cases of carbon monoxide poisoning go undetected.

Ensure that you and your family are protected from this silent killer. Make this year’s carbon monoxide awareness week the one where you take action, ensure that your fossil fuel appliances have been serviced in the last year and that you have a carbon monoxide alarm.

If you think there may be carbon monoxide present in your home, open windows and doors, call the gas board and seek medical advice for any symptoms you may be suffering.

Here are some useful sites for more information on carbon monoxide:

http://www.gassaferegister.co.uk/learn_how_to_be_gas_safe/carbon_monoxide_poisoning/co_awareness_week.aspx

http://www.hse.gov.uk/gas/domestic/co/coawareweek.htm

Carbon Monoxide, a tragic death

After having taken the precaution of having ones chimney swept and boiler serviced you would think that you would be safe from carbon monoxide poisoning. Unfortunately, this was not the case for an elderly retired law lecturer who died from carbon monoxide poisoning the morning after having his coal pellet burning central heating boiler and flue cleaned by a chimney sweep.

What makes this case even more tragic is, that the gentleman’s wife had suffered from chest pains and a bad headache that day and had been admitted to hospital, as she was an angina sufferer. It was later confirmed that she had also been suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning. As her husband did not complain of any symptoms at the time, carbon monoxide poisoning was overlooked and he stayed at home. The gentleman was found slumped in a chair in his home the next morning and was declared dead at the scene.

This case highlights how valuable a carbon monoxide alarm can be. If only one had been installed at this home, this senseless death could have been prevented. If you use fossil fuels (gas, oil, coal and wood) within your home, you could be at risk from carbon monoxide poisoning.

The symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are headache, sore throat, dizziness and nausea. More severe poisoning can result in confusion, drowsiness and difficulty breathing. Ultimately it leads to coma and death.

Further  information can be found in the Belfast Telegraph